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    Teaching for Experiential Learning: Five Approaches That Work (Hardback) By (author) Scott D. Wurdinger, By (author) Julie A. Carlson

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    DescriptionThis book describes how to change the way in which educators conduct business in the classroom. Our current educational systems lack ways to reach today's learners in relevant, meaningful ways. The five approaches in this book inspire and motivate students to learn. The authors provide in-depth descriptions into these overlapping approaches for experiential learning: active learning, problem-based learning, project-based learning, service learning, and place-based education. Each of these five approaches includes an element of student involvement and attempts to engage students in solving problems. The chapters are presented in a consistent, easy-to-read format that provides descriptions, history, research, ways to use the approach, and resources. This book will help educators transform their classrooms into dynamic learning environments.


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  • Full bibliographic data for Teaching for Experiential Learning

    Title
    Teaching for Experiential Learning
    Subtitle
    Five Approaches That Work
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Scott D. Wurdinger, By (author) Julie A. Carlson
    Physical properties
    Format: Hardback
    Number of pages: 126
    Width: 157 mm
    Height: 231 mm
    Thickness: 15 mm
    Weight: 295 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9781607093671
    ISBN 10: 1607093677
    Classifications

    B&T Book Type: NF
    BIC E4L: EDU
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: S3.8
    B&T Merchandise Category: TXT
    B&T Modifier: Region of Publication: 01
    BIC subject category V2: JNT, JNA
    B&T Modifier: Subject Development: 23
    Ingram Subject Code: ED
    B&T General Subject: 340
    B&T Modifier: Subject Development: 05
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 02
    B&T Modifier: Text Format: 06
    DC22: 371.102
    LC subject heading:
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 17220
    LC subject heading:
    BISAC V2.8: EDU029030
    LC subject heading: ,
    BISAC V2.8: EDU012000, EDU003000
    LC subject heading:
    DC22: 371.39
    LC subject heading:
    BISAC region code: 4.0.1.0.0.0.0
    LC classification: LB1027.23 .W86 2010
    Thema V1.0: JNA, JNT
    Illustrations note
    black & white illustrations, black & white tables, figures
    Publisher
    ROWMAN & LITTLEFIELD
    Imprint name
    Rowman & Littlefield Education
    Publication date
    16 December 2009
    Publication City/Country
    Lanham
    Author Information
    Scott Wurdinger is a professor of experiential education and leadership studies at Minnesota State University, Mankato, and works with schools to integrate more experiential learning. Julie Carlson's career as an educator spans three decades of outdoor, adventure, and experiential learning endeavors. She is a faculty member in the Department of Educational Leadership at Minnesota State University, Mankato.
    Review quote
    This is an excellent book that broadens the concept of experiential learning methodologies, situating them within developmental pedagogies. -- Walter Enloe, coauthor of Project Circles and Learning Circles and former lead teacher and principal of the Paideia School and Hiroshima International School Wurdinger and Carlson clearly understand that experiential education is a broad concept that is not narrowly defined to a specific methodology or programmatic manifestation. This is a commendable effort to develop language that experiential educators from very different perspectives can use to talk with one another and to the broader world of educational policy making in general. -- Jasper Hunt, coordinator, Experiential Education Graduate Program, Minnesota State University-Mankato The book provides conceptual understanding and is nonprescriptive in the delivery of theory and knowledge about this growing field that is crossing different academic content borders... Written in a user-friendly style, this book is quite easy to read and is useful for different audiences... Recommended. CHOICE After reading the book I find the approaches unassailable. The author's of this book have discovered five major themes of importance if the education system in America wants to get it right: 1. Motivation and interest is always the key to learning 2. Learning is much more complex than regurgitating facts 3. Applying, doing and producing enhances long-term memory and productivity 4. Schools and teachers that use the experiential methods discussed in this book produce a different and superior set of skills than do schools that are using traditional delivery methods 5. This superior set of skills is not measured by NCLB and AYP measurements. Research and experience as discussed in this book prove that experiential forms of learning are superior in many ways. And the author's also point out that schools as presently structured can move in this direction. Or, if not, there are ways to create schools that restructure to accommodate experiential learning. What are you waiting for?? -- Ronald Newell, evaluation director, EdVisions Schools After reading the book I find the approaches unassailable. The author's of this book have discovered five major themes of importance if the education system in America wants to get it right: 1. Motivation and interest is always the key to learning 2. Learning is much more complex than regurgitating facts 3. Applying, doing and producing enhances long-term memory and productivity 4. Schools and teachers that use the experiential methods discussed in this book produce a different and superior set of skills than do schools that are using traditional delivery methods 5. This superior set of skills is not measured by NCLB and AYP measurements. Research and experience as discussed in this book prove that experiential forms of learning are superior in many ways. And the author's also point out that schools as presently structured can move in this direction. Or, if not, there are ways to create schools that restructure to accommodate experiential learning. What are you waiting for? -- Ronald Newell, evaluation director, EdVisions Schools