Tall Man: The Death of Doomadgee

Tall Man: The Death of Doomadgee

Hardback

By (author) Chloe Hooper

List price $23.99

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  • Publisher: Scribner Book Company
  • Format: Hardback | 258 pages
  • Dimensions: 142mm x 216mm x 30mm | 363g
  • Publication date: 7 April 2009
  • Publication City/Country: New York, NY
  • ISBN 10: 1416561595
  • ISBN 13: 9781416561590
  • Edition: 1
  • Illustrations note: black & white illustrations, maps
  • Sales rank: 47,257

Product description

In 2004 on Palm Island, an Aboriginal settlement in the "Deep North" of Australia, a thirty-six-year-old man named Cameron Doomadgee was arrested for swearing at a white police officer. Forty minutes later he was dead in the jailhouse. The police claimed he'd tripped on a step, but his liver was ruptured. The main suspect was Senior Sergeant Christopher Hurley, a charismatic cop with long experience in Aboriginal communities and decorations for his work. Chloe Hooper was asked to write about the case by the pro bono lawyer who represented Cameron Doomadgee's family. He told her it would take a couple of weeks. She spent three years following Hurley's trail to some of the wildest and most remote parts of Australia, exploring Aboriginal myths and history and the roots of brutal chaos in the Palm Island community. Her stunning account goes to the heart of a struggle for power, revenge, and justice. Told in luminous detail, Tall Man is as urgent as "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee" and "The Executioner's Song." It is the story of two worlds clashing -- and a haunting moral puzzle that no reader will forget.

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Review quote

"Every sentence is weighed, considered, even, restrained. Every character is explored for their contradictions, every situation observed for its nuances, every easy judgment suspended. Hooper has a feeling for the intimacy of violence, the fragility of the flesh, the tawdry inevitability of corruption, the fathomless depth of loss." "-- THE SYDNEY MORNING HERALD"