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    A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again (Abacus) (Paperback) By (author) David Foster Wallace

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    DescriptionA collection of insightful and uproariously funny non-fiction by the bestselling author of INFINITE JEST - one of the most acclaimed and adventurous writers of our time. A SUPPOSEDLY FUN THING...brings together Wallace's musings on a wide range of topics, from his early days as a nationally ranked tennis player to his trip on a commercial cruiseliner. In each of these essays, Wallace's observations are as keen as they are funny. Filled with hilarious details and invigorating analyses, these essays brilliantly expose the fault line in American culture - and once again reveal David Foster Wallace's extraordinary talent and gargantuan intellect.


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  • Full bibliographic data for A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again

    Title
    A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) David Foster Wallace
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 368
    Width: 126 mm
    Height: 196 mm
    Thickness: 32 mm
    Weight: 299 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780349110011
    ISBN 10: 0349110018
    Classifications

    DC21: 813.54
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T13.0
    BIC language qualifier (language as subject) V2: 2ABM
    Libri: ENGM1010
    LC subject heading:
    BIC subject category V2: WH
    LC subject heading: ,
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 21110
    Libri: AMER3710
    Ingram Subject Code: LC
    DC22: 814.54
    BIC E4L: HUM
    BISAC V2.8: LCO010000
    BIC subject category V2: 2ABM
    Thema V1.0: WH
    Publisher
    Little, Brown Book Group
    Imprint name
    Abacus
    Publication date
    01 February 2010
    Publication City/Country
    London
    Author Information
    David Foster Wallace is the author of the novels THE BROOM OF THE SYSTEM (Abacus pb August 1997) and INFINITE JEST (L,B hb 1996, Abacus pb June 1997) and the short story collection GIRL WITH CURIOUS HAIR (Abacus pb November 1997)
    Review quote
    It's the kind of book you can't even put down while brushing your teeth. He's damn good. I take my hat off to him. GUARDIAN Enviably good. SUNDAY TIMES Like sea air, David Foster Wallace is so bracing. GLASGOW HERALD Brilliant. MAXIM
    Review text
    This collection of essays by hot novelist Wallace (Infinite Jest, 1996, etc.) is sometimes tiresome but often truly rewarding. Wallace is a fine prose stylist of the post-Beat school. His long sentences overflow with prepositional phrases; commas are scarce. At his best - which is to say, about half the time here - Wallace writes with an intensity that transforms rambling reportage into a sui generis mode of weird philosophizing. He makes deft use of footnotes to pile up insights beneath the flow of his main line of thought. Especially brilliant is the collection's opening essay, in which Wallace looks back on his childhood experiences as a midwestern junior tennis star through the lens of his collegiate obsession with mathematics. The tennis world, treated at length in Infinite Jest, resurfaces in a sensitive profile of rising American player Michael Joyce. Otherwise, Wallace's best work comes in two pieces that originally appeared in Harper's: a ferocious investigative report on the culture of luxury cruises, and the record of another carnival voyage, this one a trip to the Illinois State Fair. A book review competently discusses literary-theoretical debates over the death-of-the-author thesis. Elsewhere in the volume, Wallace takes determined dives into banality. A more judicious, albeit less focused, effort finds Wallace on the set with filmmaker David Lynch, whom he presents as a contemporary artistic hero. A sprawling meditation on televison and contemporary fiction lays out many intriguing theories, but its main point, that TV irony snares rather than liberates viewers, doesn't make news. At his best, the exuberant Wallace amazes with his "Taoistic ability to control via noncontrol." But - to continue quoting from his opening tour-de-force, "Derivative Sport in Tornado Alley" - eschewing discipline exacts a price: "Force without law has no shape, only tendency and duration." (Kirkus Reviews)