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Sun, the Moon and the Stars

Sun, the Moon and the Stars

Book rating: 05 Paperback

By (author) Steven Brust

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  • Publisher: St Martin's Press
  • Format: Paperback | 210 pages
  • Dimensions: 140mm x 213mm x 20mm | 249g
  • Publication date: 1 July 1996
  • Publication City/Country: New York
  • ISBN 10: 0312860390
  • ISBN 13: 9780312860394
  • Edition statement: 1st Orb Ed
  • Illustrations note: black & white illustrations
  • Sales rank: 563,438

Product description

Once upon a time there was a kingdom that lived in darkness, for the sun, the moon and the stars were hidden in a box, and that box was hidden in a sow's belly, and that sow was hidden in a troll's cave, and that cave was hidden at the end of the world. Once upon a time there was a studio of artists who feared they were doomed to obscurity, for though they worked and they worked, no one was interested in the paintings that stood in racks along their studio walls. Steven Brust's fantasy novel "The Sun, the Moon, and the Stars" is a tale of two quests, of two young men who are reaching for the moon. And the sun. And the stars.

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Author information

Born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and raised in a family of Hungarian labor organizers, Steven Brust worked as a musician and a computer programmer before coming to prominence as a writer in 1983 with "Jhereg," the first of his novels about Vlad Taltos, a human professional assassin in a world dominated by long-lived, magically-empowered human-like "Dragaerans." Over the next several years, several more "Taltos" novels followed, interspersed with other work, including "To Reign in Hell," a fantasy re-working of Milton's war in Heaven; "The Sun, the Moon, and the Stars," a contemporary fantasy based on Hungarian folktales; and a science fiction novel, "Cowboy Feng's Space Bar and Grille." The most recent "Taltos" novels are "Dragon" and" Issola." In 1991, with "The Phoenix Guards," Brust began another series, set a thousand years earlier than the Taltos books; its sequels are "Five Hundred Years After" and the three volumes of "The Viscount of Adrilankha": "The Paths of the Dead, The Lord of Castle Black, "and" Sethra Lavode." While writing, Brust has continued to work as a musician, playing drums for the legendary band Cats Laughing and recording an album of his own work, A Rose for Iconoclastes. He lives in Las Vegas, Nevada where he pursues an ongoing interest in stochastics.

Customer reviews

By Lily Kovac 23 Feb 2013 5

This beautiful story is quirkily set out. The narrator's voice is captivating, and the author has a real story-telling style. I adore this book, and was thrilled to get another copy of it as my original copy was borrowed from me about ten years ago but never returned. I'm not lending out this one again.

Review quote

"Steven Brust is a master stylist." --"Publishers Weekly" "In a genre that's mostly done by the numbers, Steven Brush maintains a hipster charm and an originality of mind." --"The Philadelphia Inquirer"

Editorial reviews

According to the publisher, this is the first of "an ongoing series of fantasy novels . . .retelling, well-loved, classic fairy and folk tales." This particular well-loved classic concerns the gypsy wizard Csucskari, who vows to locate the sun, moon and stars (they are hidden in a cave at the end of the world) and replace them in the sky; his reward will be half the kingdom plus the hand of the king's daughter in marriage. Interspersed with this brief but amusing tale is the remaining nine tenths of the book: an orthodox rendering of the trials and tribulations of a studio of starving artists as they work, argue, and try to scrape together the wherewithal to mount the exhibition that might save the studio from breaking up. The only discernible connection between the two yarns is that the gypsy tale is being told to the studio members by Greg Kovaks, one of the artists. The arty bits are occasionally interesting but more often plain dull, as Greg endlessly explains his artistic perceptions and impulses. All very well. But does it qualify as fantasy? No. Is it, in fact, a retelling of a folk tale? No. And readers who buy the book on that basis will have every right to feel aggrieved. (Kirkus Reviews)

Back cover copy

Once upon a time there was a kingdom that lived in darkness, for the sun, the moon and the stars were hidden in a box, and that box was hidden in a sow's belly, and that sow was hidden in a troll's cave, and that cave was hidden at the end of the world. Once upon a time there was a studio of artists who feared they were doomed to obscurity, for though they worked and they worked, no one was interested in the paintings that stood in racks along their studio walls. The Sun, the Moon, & the Stars is a tale of two quests, of two young men who are reaching for the moon. And the sun. And the stars.