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    Strumpet City (Paperback) By (author) James Plunkett

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    DescriptionThe classic, powerful novel of life and hard times in Dublin during the angry years leading up to World War I. A story bursting with memorable characters caught up in the bitter struggles of the age, driven by love and hate, pride and devotion.


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  • Full bibliographic data for Strumpet City

    Title
    Strumpet City
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) James Plunkett
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 576
    Width: 110 mm
    Height: 178 mm
    Weight: 295 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780099187509
    ISBN 10: 0099187507
    Classifications

    DC21: 823.914
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: F2.3
    BIC E4L: HIS
    BIC subject category V2: FV
    LC subject heading:
    LC classification: PR6066.L84
    BISAC V2.8: FIC000000
    Edition
    New edition
    Edition statement
    New edition
    Publisher
    Cornerstone
    Imprint name
    ARROW BOOKS LTD
    Publication date
    01 August 1978
    Publication City/Country
    London
    Review text
    This lengthy opus strives for an epic effect in a manipulated fashion. It's a nexus of melodramatic incidents involving characters swept up in the troubles of turn-of-the-century Dublin. There's a complacent slum lord; a cold, self-righteous priest; another-priest Who is a despairing alcoholic, a prostitute and her kind, gentlemanly lover; a struggling young married couple and a beggar/poet. The book centers on a series of strikes - the futile uprising of the poor - and the fierce reprisals by the scabs. There are meetings and beatings and innocents wronged and some terribly sad deaths. The author supplies emotion rather than real motivation.... it doesn't have-much staying power. (Kirkus Reviews)