The Structure of Emotions: Investigations in Cognitive Philosophy

The Structure of Emotions: Investigations in Cognitive Philosophy

Paperback Cambridge Studies in Philosophy

By (author) Robert M. Gordon, Series edited by Ernest Sosa, Series edited by Jonathan Dancy, Series edited by John Haldane, Series edited by Gilbert Harman, Series edited by Frank Jackson, Series edited by William G. Lycan, Series edited by Sydney Shoemaker, Series edited by Judith Jarvis Thomson

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  • Publisher: CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
  • Format: Paperback | 176 pages
  • Dimensions: 140mm x 212mm x 14mm | 222g
  • Publication date: 1 June 2003
  • Publication City/Country: Cambridge
  • ISBN 10: 0521395682
  • ISBN 13: 9780521395687
  • Edition statement: Revised ed.
  • Illustrations note: 8 b/w illus.
  • Sales rank: 1,019,735

Product description

The Structure of Emotions argues that emotion concepts should have a much more important role in the social and behavioural sciences than they now enjoy, and shows that certain influential psychological theories of emotions overlook the explanatory power of our emotion concepts. Professor Gordon also outlines a new account of the nature of commonsense (or 'folk') psychology in general.

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Review quote

'By emphasising the ineluctably causal nature of the emotions his analysis fits in well with contemporary work on the causal theory of action and thought. It also makes for a clear picture of how emotions influence, and on occasion explain, intentional action. An important thesis of Gordon's book is that most emotions have a propositional object, that is, are directed to actual or imagined states of affairs. This theme is convincingly developed, and leads to a number of instructive dictinctions. I heartily recommend this book.' Donald Davidson

Back cover copy

The Structure of Emotions argues that emotion concepts should have a much more important role in the social and behavioral sciences than they now enjoy, and shows that certain influential psychological theories of emotions overlook the explanatory power of our emotion concepts. Professor Gordon also outlines a new account of the nature of common sense ( or 'folk') psychology in general.

Table of contents

Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Formal insight; 2. Pivotal distinctions; 3. Factive emotions; 4. Epistemic emotions; 5. The trivilisation of emotions: James and Schachter; 6. Th epassivity of emotions; 7. Folk psychology, pretend play and the normality of knowledge; References; Index.