Sowing Seeds in the Desert

Sowing Seeds in the Desert : Natural Farming, Global Restoration, and Ultimate Food Security

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The earth is in great peril, due to the corporatization of agriculture, the rising climate crisis, and the ever-increasing levels of global poverty, starvation, and desertification on a massive scale. This present condition of global trauma is not "natural," but a result of humanity's destructive actions. And, according to Masanobu Fukuoka, it is reversible. We need to change not only our methods of earth stewardship, but also the very way we think about the relationship between human beings and nature. Fukuoka grew up on a farm on the island of Shikoku in Japan. As a young man he worked as a customs inspector for plants going into and out of the country. This was in the 1930s when science seemed poised to create a new world of abundance and leisure, when people fully believed they could improve upon nature by applying scientific methods and thereby reap untold rewards. While working there, Fukuoka had an insight that changed his life forever. He returned to his home village and applied this insight to developing a revolutionary new way of farming that he believed would be of great benefit to society. This method, which he called "natural farming," involved working with, not in opposition to, nature. Fukuoka's inspiring and internationally best-selling book, The One-Straw Revolution was first published in English in 1978. In this book, Fukuoka described his philosophy of natural farming and why he came to farm the way he did. One-Straw was a huge success in the West, and spoke directly to the growing movement of organic farmers and activists seeking a new way of life. For years after its publication, Fukuoka traveled around the world spreading his teachings and developing a devoted following of farmers seeking to get closer to the truth of nature. Sowing Seeds in the Desert, a summation of those years of travel and research, is Fukuoka's last major work-and perhaps his most important. Fukuoka spent years working with people and organizations in Africa, India, Southeast Asia, Europe, and the United States, to prove that you could, indeed, grow food and regenerate forests with very little irrigation in the most desolate of places. Only by greening the desert, he said, would the world ever achieve true food security. This revolutionary book presents Fukuoka's plan to rehabilitate the deserts of the world using natural farming, including practical solutions for feeding a growing human population, rehabilitating damaged landscapes, reversing the spread of desertification, and providing a deep understanding of the relationship between human beings and nature. Fukuoka's message comes right at the time when people around the world seem to have lost their frame of reference, and offers us a way forward.

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  • Paperback | 216 pages
  • 127 x 200.66 x 17.78mm | 249.47g
  • Chelsea Green Publishing Co
  • White River JunctionUnited States
  • English
  • Reprint
  • Black and White Reproductions of Original Brush and Ink Drawings
  • 1603585222
  • 9781603585224
  • 77,744

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Publishers Weekly-Renowned Japanese agriculturist and philosopher Fukuoka's (The One-Straw Revolution) final work calls on modern-day farmers to reconsider their methods and heed the needs of the land. Navigating work with international organizations--particularly in Africa, South Asia, and the United States--he illuminates regional disparities in environmental and agricultural thought and practice. Through trial-and-error and years of acute observation, Fukuoka developed a pioneering vision to 'avoid unnecessary work, especially work that was created as an adverse side effect of previous actions.' He describes these misguided experiments and failures, such as leaving an orchard completely on its own, as 'not natural farming; it was abandonment.' In clarifying popular misconceptions about organic and natural farming, he advises that we must not focus on cash crops, because 'there is no good or bad among life-forms on earth.' Only by the co-existence of myriad micro-organisms and vegetation will we be able to preserve and maintain our land. More important, the best farming was simple, 'rather than the modern approach of applying increasingly complex techniques to remake nature entirely for the benefit of human beings.' Though elimination of mechanization might be tough for modern agriculturalists to swallow, Fukuoka's last message provides a spiritually and environmentally enriching alternative to the farming conditions we know today.

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