Sight Unseen

Sight Unseen

Paperback

By (author) Robert Goddard

List price $12.55

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Paperback $10.53
  • Publisher: Corgi Books
  • Format: Paperback | 448 pages
  • Dimensions: 106mm x 178mm x 36mm | 181g
  • Publication date: 5 December 2005
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 0552152102
  • ISBN 13: 9780552152105
  • Sales rank: 119,949

Product description

It is a hot summer's day in the tourist village of Avebury.A man sits outside the Red Lion pub, waiting. He sees a woman with three young children, two of them running ahead while their sister dawdles behind. A child's voice catches on the breeze. For want of anything more interesting to do, the man watches. He sees nothing sinister or threatening. Even when another figure enters his field of vision, he does not react. The figure is ordinary - male, short-haired, stockily built.But he is moving fast, at a loping run. And then it happens. In one swift movement, the running man grabs the youngest child and carries her away. Still the man outside the pub does not react. Suddenly, awhite transit van bursts into view, its engine racing, its rear door slamming shut.The child and her abductor are inside. The child's sister rushes forward. The man outside the pub jumps up...The tragedy begins at Avebury.But it does not end there.

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Author information

Robert Goddard was born in Hampshire. He read History at Cambridge and worked as an educational administrator in Devon before becoming a full-time novelist. His bestselling novels are: Past Caring, In Pale Battalions, Painting the Darkness, Into the Blue (winner of the first WH Smith Thumping Good Read Award and dramatized for TV in 1997, starring John Thaw), Take No Farewell, Hand in Glove, Closed Circle, Borrowed Time, Out of the Sun (a sequel to Into the Blue), Beyond Recall, Caught in the Light, Set in Stone, Sea Change, Dying to Tell, Days Without Number and Play to the End.

Review quote

"'Exhibits his mastery of plot, tension and action'" The Times "'A typically taut tale of wrecked lives, family tragedy, historical quirks and moral consequences'" The Times "'A superbly plotted thriller with an astonishing but totally satisfying climax'" Good Book Guide

Editorial reviews

Twenty three years after an unsolved kidnapping, an anonymous letter reopens a case involving the latest in Goddard's long line of innocent, compromised bystanders.July 27, 1981. David Umber, a graduate student at Cambridge whose project is identifying the 18th-century whistle-blower known only as Junius, has gone to the town of Avebury to meet a man named Griffin, who's promised him a peek at an old edition of Junius's correspondence with a remarkable inscription. Griffin never shows up, so Umber is sitting alone watching in stupefaction when someone snatches two-year-old Tamsin Hall from Sally Wilkinson, her nanny, and runs over Tamsin's sister Miranda, seven, when she gives chase. Drawn together by their shocked inability to prevent the tragedy, Umber and Sally become lovers, then spouses, then exes, before Sally's death in 1999. All's well that ends ill until George Sharp, the retired Chief Inspector once in charge of the case, turns up in Prague to pluck Umber from his lecturing stint and cart him back to Avebury. Sharp's received a letter urging him to revisit the case-a letter signed "Junius" that consists entirely of cut-and-paste excerpts from Junius's letters. The hook is irresistible, and so is the delicious thrill of watching Umber, like many other Goddard heroes (Play to the End, 2006, etc.), get led by the nose by every witness he interviews-the surviving Halls, Sally's therapist and best friend, a private eye who's been working the case for over 20 years-till he's cut loose from Sharp and dropped through a series of trap doors. The sense of urbane paranoia is skillfully maintained through one mind-boggling surprise after another. Only the final revelation is a letdown.A suavely sturdy suspenser, first published in the UK in 2005, that manages better than most Goddards to lead its well-meaning hero through ever more insidious snares without making him look like a complete fool. (Kirkus Reviews)