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She-Wolves: The Women Who Ruled England Before Elizabeth

She-Wolves: The Women Who Ruled England Before Elizabeth

Paperback

By (author) Helen Castor

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  • Publisher: Faber & Faber Non-Fiction
  • Format: Paperback | 496 pages
  • Dimensions: 126mm x 194mm x 38mm | 399g
  • Publication date: 7 July 2011
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 0571237061
  • ISBN 13: 9780571237067
  • Illustrations note: Illustrations (chiefly col.), map
  • Sales rank: 30,200

Product description

In medieval England, man was the ruler of woman, and the King was the ruler of all. How, then, could royal power lie in female hands? In She-Wolves, celebrated historian, Helen Castor, tells the dramatic and fascinating stories of four exceptional women who, while never reigning queens, held great power: Matilda, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Isabella of France and Margaret of Anjou. These were women who paved the way for Jane Grey, Mary Tudor and Elizabeth I - the Tudor queens who finally confronted what it meant to be a female monarch.

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Author information

Helen Castor is a medieval historian and a Bye-Fellow of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge. Her book, Blood & Roses, a biography of the fifteenth-century Paston family, was longlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize in 2005 and won the English Association's Beatrice White Prize in 2006. Her second, She-Wolves, was made into a major BBC TV series. Joan of Arc: A History is her latest published book. She lives in London with her husband and son.

Review quote

"Castor skillfully combines this analysis with driving narratives, using vivd details from contemporary chronicles to bring those distant days alive. "She-Wolves" makes one gasp at the brutality of medieval power struggles--and at the strength and vitality of the women who sought to wield royal power."--Jenny Uglow, Financial Times