In the Shadow of the Glen. Riders to the Sea. the Well of the Saints. the Tinker's Wedding

In the Shadow of the Glen. Riders to the Sea. the Well of the Saints. the Tinker's Wedding

Paperback

By (author) J M Synge, By (author) John Millington Synge

$8.14
List price $17.37
You save $9.23 53% off

Free delivery worldwide
Available
Dispatched in 3 business days
When will my order arrive?

  • Publisher: Rarebooksclub.com
  • Format: Paperback | 36 pages
  • Dimensions: 189mm x 246mm x 2mm | 82g
  • Publication date: 13 September 2013
  • ISBN 10: 1236811666
  • ISBN 13: 9781236811660
  • Illustrations note: black & white illustrations

Product description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1912 edition. Excerpt: ...wrinkle you have round by your eye. TIMMY--looking at him sharply.--The day's not dark since the clouds broke in the east. MARTIN DOUL. Let you not be tormenting yourself trying to make me afeard. You told me a power of bad lies the time I was blind, and it's right now for you to stop, and be taking your rest (Mary Doul comes in unnoticed on right with a sack filled with green stuff on her arm), for it's little ease or quiet any person would get if the big fools of Ireland weren't weary at times. (He looks up and sees Mary Doul.) Oh. glory be to God, she's coming again. He begins to work busily with his back to her. TIMMY--amused, to Mary Doul, as she is going by without looking at them.--Look on him now. Mary Doul. You'd be a great one for keeping him steady at his work, for he's after idling and blathering to this hour from the dawn of day. MARY DOUL--sti1fly.--Of what is it you're speaking, Timmy the smith? TIMMY--laughing.--Of himself, surely. Look on him there, and he with the shirt on him ripping from his back. You'd have a right to come round this night, I'm thinking, and put a stitch into his clothes, for it's long enough you are not speaking one to the other. MARY DOUL. Let the two of you not torment me at all. She goes out left, with her head in the air. MARTIN DOUL--stops work and looks after her.--Well, isn't it a queer thing she can't keep herself two days without looking on my face? TIMMY--jeeringly.--Looking on your face is it? And she after going by with her head turned the way you'd see a priest going where there'd be a drunken man in the side ditch talking with a girl. (Martin Doul gets up and goes to corner of forge, and looks out...

Other people who viewed this bought:

Showing items 1 to 10 of 10