Serious Pig: An American Cook in Search of His Roots

Serious Pig: An American Cook in Search of His Roots

Paperback

By (author) John Thorne, With Matt Lewis Thorne

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  • Publisher: North Point Press
  • Format: Paperback | 528 pages
  • Dimensions: 142mm x 206mm x 36mm | 476g
  • Publication date: 16 November 2000
  • Publication City/Country: New York, NY
  • ISBN 10: 0865475970
  • ISBN 13: 9780865475977
  • Edition statement: Reprint
  • Illustrations note: black & white illustrations
  • Sales rank: 1,762,806

Product description

In this collection of essays, John Thorne sets our to explore the origins of his identity as a cook, going "here" (the Maine coast, where he'd summered as a child and returned as an adult for a decade's sojourn), "there" (southern Louisiana, where he was captivated by Creole and Cajun cooking), and "everywhere" (where he provides a sympathetic reading of such national culinary icons as the hamburger, white bread, and American cheese, and sits down to a big bowl of Texas red). These intelligent, searching essays are a passionate meditation on food, character, and place.

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Author information

John Thorne and Matt Lewis Thorne live in Northampton, MA. They have published the food letter Simple Cooking for 20 years.

Review quote

“[Thorne's] richest book yet; one in which simple disparate thoughts begin to coalesce into a genuine philosophy of food.”—Ruth Reichl, "Saveur" “Here’s a rare treat, a book in which the recipes are only a means to an end or stepping stones in cultural detective stories . . . [Thorne's] folkloric approach to food nourishes the brain as well as the body.”—William Rice, "Chicago Tribune" “The Thornes love their subject, but critically, knowledgeably and with a sense of humor that makes the narrative flow as if velvetized by mayo.”—Sheila Himmel, "The Washington Post Book World"