• Selected Poems of Sylvia Plath See large image

    Selected Poems of Sylvia Plath (Faber poetry) (Paperback) By (author) Sylvia Plath, Volume editor Ted Hughes

    $11.53 - Save $5.58 32% off - RRP $17.11 Free delivery worldwide Available
    Dispatched in 3 business days
    When will my order arrive?
    Add to basket | Add to wishlist |

    DescriptionWhen Sylvia Plath's Ariel was published posthumously, A. Alvarez in the Observer wrote: 'If the poems are despairing, vengeful and destructive, they are at the same time tender, open to things, and also unusually clever, sardonic, hard-minded ...They are works of great artistic purity and, despite all the nihilism, great generosity ...the book is a major literary event'. This selection made by Ted Hughes from all her work shows that Sylvia Plath is clearly a major poet of the twentieth century.


Other books

Other people who viewed this bought | Other books in this category
Showing items 1 to 10 of 10

 

Reviews | Bibliographic data
  • Full bibliographic data for Selected Poems of Sylvia Plath

    Title
    Selected Poems of Sylvia Plath
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Sylvia Plath, Volume editor Ted Hughes
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 96
    Width: 129 mm
    Height: 198 mm
    Thickness: 8 mm
    Weight: 124 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780571135868
    ISBN 10: 0571135862
    Classifications

    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 21500
    BIC subject category V2: DSC
    B&T Merchandise Category: GEN
    B&T Book Type: NF
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T3.1
    BIC E4L: LIT
    BIC subject category V2: DCF, DSBH
    DC21: 811.54
    BIC language qualifier (language as subject) V2: 2ACD
    Libri: B-085
    B&T General Subject: 640
    DC22: 811/.54
    BISAC V2.8: POE000000
    BIC subject category V2: 2ACD
    BISAC V2.8: POE005010
    LC classification: PS3566.L27 A6 1985B
    Thema V1.0: DSBH, DSC, DCF
    Publisher
    FABER & FABER
    Imprint name
    Faber & Faber Poetry
    Publication date
    03 March 2003
    Publication City/Country
    London
    Author Information
    Sylvia Plath (1932-63) was born in Boston, Massachusetts, and studied at Smith College. In 1955 she went to Cambridge University on a Fulbright scholarship, where she met and later married Ted Hughes. She published one collection of poems in her lifetime, The Colossus (1960), and a novel, The Bell Jar (1963). Her Collected Poems, which contains her poetry written from 1956 until her death, was published in 1981 and was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for poetry. Ted Hughes (1930-1998) was born in Yorkshire. His first book, The Hawk in the Rain, was published in 1957 by Faber & Faber and was followed by many volumes of poetry and prose for adults and children. He received the Whitbread Book of the Year for two consecutive years for his last published collections of poetry, Tales from Ovid (1997) and Birthday Letters (1998). He was Poet Laureate from 1984, and in 1998 he was appointed to the Order of Merit.
    Review text
    To judge by the selected works of a man many consider her greatest contemporary poet, England is in serious literary trouble. Careful, well-crafted, with the over-diligent working of metaphor, these poems are almost totally deficient in vitality, spontaneity, and playfulness. To quote what is no doubt an unwitting self-description, his compilation of imageries rarely goes beyond itself: "By feats of torpor, by circumventing sleights/ Of stupefaction, juggleries of benumbing,/ By lucid sophistries of sight/ To a staturing 'I am.' " The subject matter is appropriately yesteryear: references to Cuchulain, Parnell, Faustus, King and Country, The War to End All Wars; words like "behemoth," invocations such as "Aged Eye!" However, some of his later nature poems, where he assumes the guise of rock, wind, or animal, transcend this academic categorizing into a kind of ecstasy ("The moon has stepped back like an artist gazing at a work/ That points at him amazed"), giving promise to the more interesting direction of his future (now current) work. (Kirkus Reviews)