Seeing Cinderella

Seeing Cinderella

By (author) Jenny Lundquist

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Magical realism and a modern Cinderella story makes for a fun and relatable M!X read. Sixth grade is not going well for Calliope Meadow Anderson. Callie's hair is frizzy, her best friend, Ellen, is acting weird, and to top things off, she has to get glasses. And her new specs aren't even cute, trendy glasses--more like hideously large and geeky. But Callie soon discovers that her glasses have a special, magical perk: When she wears them, she can read people's thoughts. Crazy glasses aside, Callie has more drama to face when she's cast as the lead in the school play--and instead opts to be an understudy, giving the role of Cinderella to Ellen. Can Callie's magic glasses help her see her way to leading lady, or is she destined to stay in the background forever?

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  • Paperback | 225 pages
  • 129.54 x 193.04 x 20.32mm | 158.76g
  • 20 Mar 2012
  • Aladdin Paperbacks
  • New York, NY
  • English
  • 1442429267
  • 9781442429260
  • 404,813

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Author Information

Jenny Lundquist grew up in Huntington Beach, California, wearing glasses and wishing they had magic powers. They didn't, but they did help her earn a degree in Intercultural Studies at Biola University. Jenny has painted an orphanage in Mexico, taught English at a university in Russia, and hopes one day to write a book at a cafe in Paris. Jenny and her husband live in northern California with their two sons and Rambo, the world's whiniest cat.

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Customer reviews

For any tween girl and her mom (or dad or grandma or aunt)...

Did I enjoy this book: I did enjoy this book. I read it every free chance I had and finished it in short order. Seeing Cinderella was a sweet, middle grade book that would be excellent for tween girls. We go along with Callie as she discovers the power of her new glasses. They allow Callie to read other peopleâ??s thoughts. This is both a blessing and a curse of sorts for Callie as she learns to navigate through this new world and truly learns what other people are experiencing and thinking. This book has a fantastic message â?? not everyone is as they seem. You have to look at a person to truly see them. You have to get to know them inside and out because you never know what that person is experiencing. Would I recommend it: I would recommend this book to any tween girl and their moms. It was a worthwhile read. Will I read it again: Maybe when my daughter is ready to read it. I want her to read it when she is the right age.show more
by Chrissy

Seeing Cinderella by Jenny Lundquist

My rating: 5/5 stars May contain some spoilers Calliope is kind of a loner and she likes to write stories. She's kind of geeky, and it certainly doesn't help that she'll need glasses. That's when her sort of fairy godmother steps in, and that's when Callie receives her magical glasses. And they're magical because they let her see people's hidden thoughts. And she realizes that nothing's like she thought it was. I really don't want to spoil too much, because this is such a wonderful story to read! Basically she learns that nothing's what it seems and everyone has hidden secrets, even the friends you think you know the best. Or your parents. And the one you think is the bad guy, isn't always. The motives behind people's actions might not be what you think they are. And, the most important thing I should've known when I was growing up: What ever you think about yourself, it may not be what the others thinks. I have to say that I absolutely adore the picture of Jenny the 7th grader (can be found on her homepage)! It's about excactly the same as mine! I'm few years younger than Jenny, so in my 7th grade picture I'm not wearing polo shirt, but a flanel shirt. Orange. And brown. And my glasses were a little smaller, since it was year.. umm.. seriously, I can't remember and I'm too lazy to count. But anyway. I was the girl with the frizzy hair (I do have frizzy hair still, but now I know how to use straightening iron...). I was also 10 cm's (4 inches) taller than any other boy or girl in my class. So yeah, I feel the pain. I also had louzy best friend, who made me and this other girl compete for her attention, until she found a boyfriend, and me and the other girl became friends. So it was kind of painful to read this book, but painful only because it reminds us, the girls with frizzy hair, what it was like to be that age. Especially when you didn't have magical glasses! Just ordinary ones. And nearly braces *shudder* It's nice to see how someone excactly like you, or me, survives it. This is the book for all those frizzy haired girls who survived, or will survive, their lives even without the magical glasses! Love, Monaliz @ Mind Reading?show more
by Monaliz @ Mind Reading?