Save Our Sleep: Helping Your Baby to Sleep Through the Night, from Birth to Two Years

Save Our Sleep: Helping Your Baby to Sleep Through the Night, from Birth to Two Years

Book rating: 02 Paperback

By (author) Tizzie Hall

$13.91
List price $17.27
You save $3.36 19% off

Free delivery worldwide
Available
Dispatched in 2 business days
When will my order arrive?

  • Publisher: VERMILION
  • Format: Paperback | 304 pages
  • Dimensions: 134mm x 214mm x 28mm | 322g
  • Publication date: 1 April 2010
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 0091929504
  • ISBN 13: 9780091929503
  • Illustrations note: black & white illustrations
  • Sales rank: 66

Product description

Tizzie Hall is an international baby sleep expert who has been working with babies and their parents for over 15 years. Her customised sleep routines have helped thousands of restless babies sleep through the night, and now she shares the secrets of her success in this easy-to-use sleep guide, including: - Sleep routines from birth to introducing solids for breast- and bottle-fed babies, - Teaching your baby to settle and resettle themselves, - Solutions to sleep problems, - Common questions and case studies from parents, - How to overcome any breaks to the sleeping routine, Packed full of useful information about feeding, weaning, common health concerns and special situations that can affect your baby's sleep pattern, Save Our Sleep is the must-have book for all parents who want to save their sleep.

Other people who viewed this bought:

Showing items 1 to 10 of 10

Other books in this category

Showing items 1 to 10 of 10
Categories:

Author information

Born and raised in Ireland, Tizzie Hall has worked with children and parents for many years, helping with customised sleep solutions for their babies. Tizzie started her Save Our Sleep (SOS) business in the UK in 1996 after tertiary psychology studies and a career in private childcare. She moved to Melbourne in 2002 where she has continued the success of her infant sleep solutions business. As part of Save Our Sleep, there is also a self-help website: www.saveoursleep.com, visited by thousands of parents every week.

Customer reviews

By kjafp 09 Mar 2013 5

I have twins and I can honestly say this book has been a total godsend to me and my husband. I didn't read it until they were 3 months old and to be honest I don't think I would have followed any of the routines in the first 3 months anyway. But as soon as we started putting some of the ideas and rountine's into practice it made life for both the babies and myself so much easier.

The rountines and sleep times suited my babies perfectly at every age. They were happy when awake and this made things like shopping trips so much easier to cope with.

We started to call this book out baby bible and as soon as the bubs seemed to change or challenges with them came along, I refered to the book and there was always a solution which worked.

They are now 2 and a half and I have the follow on book 'How to Raise a Happy Toddler' and this is just as good.

It was recommended to me and I have recommended it to lots of people who have also found it as good as I have. My twins are happy, go to bed happily and sleep like a dream every day and night.

By Yvette Willmot 27 Feb 2013 1

This book is only useful for compost or as a fire starter. As a midwife and mother of 6 I plead with new mothers not to even open the book. I have met too many mothers who schedule feeds and get their baby to sleep through the night with "supply issues" who subsequently have to give up breastfeeding earlier that anticipated. Breastfeeding babies through the night (especially in the wee hours of the morning) is one of the best ways to keep up a good milk supply. It is during the night that a breastfeeding mother's levels of prolactin (a hormone that helps milk production) are highest. As well as this many mothers who adopt these routines become slaves to them.
If you want a baby who is flexible, healthy and happy and you want a good supply of breastmilk, then don't bother with this book. Put your baby first and get used to a bit less sleep - for their sake.

By Emma Knight 17 Nov 2012 1

This book is awful. The whole theory is to listen to your child screaming while you wait so many minutes before you go into their room and give them a pat, then wait so many more minutes after you've walked out again etc....
Just an awful way to teach your child to sleep. They stop crying because they've given up on their parents caring enough about them to pick them up, give them a cuddle and be with them whilst their tired/scared/hungry.
The routines are damn near impossible anyway and would drive you insane if you *gasp* had one of those different babies out there who it just didn't work with. She writes it with such an attitude that she knows your baby better than you, that if it doesn't work it's because you've failed not her routines, and that she's the expert and it doesn't matter what anyone else says. I was a bit disturbed about some of the breastfeeding advice, for example to feed on one side for a few minutes then switch, then switch again which is plain wrong because babies need your fatty milk at the end of a feed.
Save your sanity and go with your gut, it will work way better than any snotty nosed woman who feels she's a better parent than you

By Kelly Winder 26 Oct 2012 1

Babies are not designed to be convenient little packages that sleep through the night from birth and feed in specifically spaced increments. Waking is a survival mechanism and cluster feeding serves a purpose - to make more milk so baby can grow.

There is an abundance of books out there written by childless nannies (I get that she has now had her own bub) without formal qualifications in breastfeeding, mental health or other important qualifications that study the effects of feeding and sleep on babies. This book goes against recommendations from breastfeeding and infant mental health organisations yet continues to sell well due to its title pulling at the heart strings of sleep deprived mothers.

Babies don't expect to be fed on time schedules or routines, especially when its summer and they are thirstier. We don't schedule drinks for a child or adult in summer (let alone any other time), so why a baby?

I get its tough and exhausting being sleep deprived, my third baby is almost 3 months old. But we have a happy baby and happy household because we tune in to what our baby needs. Who cares if she wakes in the night, I know her body needs food. I still function during the day and I don't have much help either.

I know many mothers who have had supply issues when their babies are scheduling feeds - its just not best for baby. I have never seen a cow in a field with a watch on... so how do they know when to feed their babies?

So I ask at what cost, when what can often happen with supply issues is mum resorting to formula, and we now know that in SIDS cases (while they are much lower than they used to be), 50% more cases are bottlefed babies - Sids n Kids have revised their guidelines based on many studies over the years showing this time and time again. It all becomes a slippery slope.

I know tiredness in motherhood - but there are other, better, gentler methods out there which are safe and kind to your baby.

Highly recommend Pinky McKay's books and I hear Pantley is good too.

By nicole antonello 06 May 2012 1

This book lacks evidence. This book is not up to date with breastfeeding advice, and doesn't support healthy emotional development of babies.

Review quote

"Australian sleep guru" The Times