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    The Satanic Verses (Hardback)(English / French) By (author) Salman Rushdie

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    DescriptionWhen a jumbo jet blows apart above the English Channel, Gabreel and Saladin are two who survive and are washed up on an English beach. However, it soon becomes clear that curious changes have come over them and that they have been chosen as protagonists in the eternal struggle between God and the Devil. Salman Rushdie is the author of "Midnight's Children", winner of the 1981 Booker Prize, and "Shame".


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    Title
    The Satanic Verses
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Salman Rushdie
    Physical properties
    Format: Hardback
    Number of pages: 560
    Width: 169 mm
    Height: 237 mm
    Thickness: 43 mm
    Weight: 798 g
    Language
    English
    French
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780670825370
    ISBN 10: 0670825379
    Classifications

    BIC E4L: GEN
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: F1.1
    B&T Merchandise Category: GEN
    DC22: 823.914
    BIC subject category V2: FA
    B&T General Subject: 360
    B&T Book Type: FI
    DC22: FIC
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 11110
    LC subject heading:
    B&T Modifier: Region of Publication: 03
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 05
    LC subject heading:
    Ingram Subject Code: FC
    Libri: I-FC
    DC22: 823/.914
    LC subject heading:
    B&T Approval Code: P25200000
    Ingram Theme: APPR/RDRCAT
    LC subject heading: , , , , ,
    BISAC V2.8: FIC000000
    LC classification: PR9499.3.R
    LC subject heading:
    BISAC V2.8: FIC019000
    LC classification: PR6068.U757 S27 1988
    BISAC region code: 1.1.2.2.0.0.0
    Publisher
    Penguin Books Ltd
    Imprint name
    VIKING
    Publication date
    22 February 1989
    Publication City/Country
    London
    Author Information
    Born in Bombay in 1947, Salman Rushdie is the author of six novels, including Grimus, Shame, The Satanic Verses, The Moor's Last Sigh, and The Ground Beneath Her Feet, and a volume of essays, Imaginary Homelands. His numerous literary prizes include the Booker Prize for Midnight's Children and the Whitbread Prize for The Satanic Verses.
    Review text
    This controversial novel, banned in India for its alleged blasphemy against the Prophet Mohammed, is a surreal hallucinatory feast. Rushdie (Midnight's Children; Shame, etc.), long a magical realist, turns finally to Islam for his jumping, off point, and his inventiveness never flags. Satan, according to an epigraph by Defoe, has no fixed place to settle, and the difficulty of telling good from evil, the way that one reincarnates into the other, is the theme of this epic tale - which contains stories within stories, dreams within dreams. It begins with the explosion of a hijacked jumbo jet; Gibreel Farishta, a Bombay movie star, and Saladin Chamcha, an exile who lives in Britain, survive their free fall from the plane. Gibreel then presides over the dream/stow worlds of his "arehangelic other self" after he and Saladin are transformed into angelic or satanic opponents. (They are never certain which is which.) The central story concerns Mahound, the Prophet of Jahilia who founds the religion of "those who submit," which parallels Islam; another is about Ayesha, a contemporary visionary who leads a group of villagers to the sea, where she promises that the waves will part before them (they all drown, of course); yet another dream-story involves the Imam, a sort of grim Ayatollah. Such a summary does the book a disservice, however, because all of these stories and many others besides are woven together with cross-references, psychic communications, brisk farces and satires, and interconnected picaresque. Rushdie does for Islam what Mark Helprin did (a little less successfully) for New York in his Winter's Tale: peoples it with fantastic figures that always seem close to some ineffable imaginative truth - even as Rushdie fast-cuts to the next scene in his phantasmagoric dream-time world. Whether it all finally holds together or not is almost beside the point: this is an entertainment in the highest sense of that much-exploited word. (Kirkus Reviews)