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Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea: Why the Greeks Matter

Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea: Why the Greeks Matter

Paperback Hinges of History

By (author) Thomas Cahill

$14.08

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  • Publisher: Anchor Books
  • Format: Paperback | 352 pages
  • Dimensions: 130mm x 203mm x 20mm | 318g
  • Publication date: 27 July 2004
  • Publication City/Country: New York, NY
  • ISBN 10: 0385495544
  • ISBN 13: 9780385495547
  • Edition statement: Reprint
  • Illustrations note: 32PP B&W ILLUS/COLOR ENDPAPERS
  • Sales rank: 121,591

Product description

In Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea, his fourth volume to explore " the hinges of history, " Thomas Cahill escorts the reader on another entertaining-- and historically unassailable-- journey through the landmarks of art and bloodshed that defined Greek culture nearly three millennia ago. In the city-states of Athens and Sparta and throughout the Greek islands, honors could be won in making love and war, and lives were rife with contradictions. By developing the alphabet, the Greeks empowered the reader, demystified experience, and opened the way for civil discussion and experimentation-- yet they kept slaves. The glorious verses of the Iliad recount a conflict in which rage and outrage spur men to action and suggest that their " bellicose society of gleaming metals and rattling weapons" is not so very distant from more recent campaigns of " shock and awe." And, centuries before Zorba, Greece was a land where music, dance, and freely flowing wine were essential to the high life. Granting equal time to the sacred and the profane, Cahill rivets our attention to the legacies of an ancient and enduring worldview.

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Author information

THOMAS CAHILL is the author of the three previous volumes in the Hinges of History series: "How the Irish Saved Civilization," "The Gifts of the Jews," and "Desire of the Everlasting Hills." They have been bestsellers, not only in the United States but also in countries ranging from Italy to Brazil. Cahill was recently invited to address the U.S. Congress on the Judeo-Christian roots of moral responsibility in American politics. He and his wife, Susan, also a writer, divide their time between New York and Rome.

Review quote

" A triumph 0f popularization: extraordinarily knowledgeable, informal in tone, amusing, wide ranging, smartly paced." "-- The New York Times Book Review "" The best introduction to classical Greek culture yet written. . . . Learned, stylish and inspiring. . . . Well-informed, insightful and on the whole written in a sparkling style." "-- Los Angeles Times "" Astonishing. . . . If anybody can get us reading about Homer, Plato, Socrates, Aristotle, Thucydides, Xenophon and more, Cahill will." "-- Chicago Tribune "" Fascinating. . . . Commendable. . . . Cahill has an impressive knowledge of the Greek world. . . . His admirable skill at summing up movements of enormous complexity surface throughout the book." "-- The Seattle Times"

Flap copy

In Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea, his fourth volume to explore "the hinges of history," Thomas Cahill escorts the reader on another entertaining--and historically unassailable--journey through the landmarks of art and bloodshed that defined Greek culture nearly three millennia ago. In the city-states of Athens and Sparta and throughout the Greek islands, honors could be won in making love and war, and lives were rife with contradictions. By developing the alphabet, the Greeks empowered the reader, demystified experience, and opened the way for civil discussion and experimentation--yet they kept slaves. The glorious verses of the Iliad recount a conflict in which rage and outrage spur men to action and suggest that their "bellicose society of gleaming metals and rattling weapons" is not so very distant from more recent campaigns of "shock and awe." And, centuries before Zorba, Greece was a land where music, dance, and freely flowing wine were essential to the high life. Granting equal time to the sacred and the profane, Cahill rivets our attention to the legacies of an ancient and enduring worldview.