The Royal Navy and the Battle of Britain

The Royal Navy and the Battle of Britain

Book rating: 02 Hardback

By (author) Anthony J. Cumming

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  • Publisher: Naval Institute Press
  • Format: Hardback | 256 pages
  • Dimensions: 155mm x 229mm x 23mm | 476g
  • Publication date: 15 September 2010
  • Publication City/Country: Annopolis
  • ISBN 10: 1591141605
  • ISBN 13: 9781591141600
  • Sales rank: 261,106

Product description

This persuasive study attacks the key myths surrounding the Battle of Britain to revise the relative status of maritime and aviation factors in the defense of Britain. Without denigrating the heroism of the fighter pilots, Anthony Cumming challenges the effectiveness of the Royal Air Force in 1940 and gives the Royal Navy much greater prominence than others have. He vigorously asserts the ability of British warships to frustrate German plans for Operation Sea Lion and to repel Luftwaffe attacks. The author argues that the RAF took the lion's share of the glory only because its colorful image could easily be used manipulate American opinion. Cumming contends that the 70th anniversary of Battle of Britain should celebrate the contributions of the many rather than focusing on the pilot elite, an assertion certain provoke discussion.

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Customer reviews

By David Crotty 10 May 2011 2

I was looking forward to reading this book but I can't remember ever feeling as let down as I do by any work having a claim to historical scholarship. History narratives stand or fall on structure, argument and evidence but 'The Royal Navy & the Battle of Britain' disappoints on all levels.

With a close examination of the evidence it should not be difficult to make the case for the Royal Navy's contribution to the battle for Britain being as great or possibly greater than that of the Royal Air Force. After all it was not the RAF that frightened the leadership of the Kriegsmarine, especially in the aftermath of the Norwegian campaign. However Mr ******* makes a hash of it by spending much of the book critiquing the RAF in great detail including its tactics, training, equipment and leadership. Most of the material for these attacks is drawn from a single source, 'Dizzy' Allen's book 'Who Won the Battle of Britain'. Even ******* admits that Allen's book overstates the case for the RAF coming off second best in the contest of July-October 1940.

This curiously unbalanced approach in making the case for the Royal Navy by tearing down the RAF is not helped by a lack of similar analysis directed at the Luftwaffe's mistakes. Not the least of which was attempting to mount a long-range strategic bombing campaign with a short-range tactical air force. Mr ******* fails to mention in his catalogue of RAF technical woes that their H/F fighter radios were next to useless too. Ultimately what any of this has to do with the Royal Navy escapes me.

There are a number a good ideas including some analysis of the overall poor performance of air weapons against ships in 1940, but no real detail on the actual nature of the threat posed to and by the Royal Navy in any long cross-channel invasion attempt using unarmed towed barges in rough seas. There was an interesting passing mention of the role of the navy in bombarding and destroying barges on the French coast but this is soon left behind. I could go on at length about other problems but my essential argument with this book is clear. Despite the title, if you want to know about the Royal Navy and the Battle of Britain this is not the book to choose.