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    Rising China and Its Postmodern Fate: Memories of Empire in a New Global Context (Studies in Security and International Affairs) (Hardback) By (author) Charles Horner

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    DescriptionAs China debates its past, how will it define its future? China's sense of today and its view of tomorrow are both rooted in the past - and we need to understand that connection, says China scholar Charles Horner. In "Rising China and Its Postmodern Fate", Horner offers a new interpretation of how China's changed view of its modern historical experience has also changed China's understanding of its long intellectual and cultural tradition. Spirited reevaluations of history, strategy, commerce, and literature are cooperating - and competing - to define the future. The capstone of modern China was the founding of the People's Republic in 1949 and its rejection of Confucianism, capitalism, and modernity. Yet today's rising China retains few vestiges of what Mao wrought. What then, Horner asks, is post-Mao, postmodern China? Where did it come from? How did it get here? Where is it going? Contemporary views of the great periods in Chinese history are having a significant influence on the development of rising China's national strategy, says Horner. He looks at the revival of interest in, and changing interpretations of, three dynasties - the Yuan (1280-1368), the Ming (1368-1644), and the Qing (1644-1912) - that, together with the People's Republic of China, provide examples of great power success. The future of every major country is now connected to China's, and this book explains how China, now seeing itself as the complex and thriving result of the old and the new, is poised to change the world.


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  • Full bibliographic data for Rising China and Its Postmodern Fate

    Title
    Rising China and Its Postmodern Fate
    Subtitle
    Memories of Empire in a New Global Context
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Charles Horner
    Physical properties
    Format: Hardback
    Number of pages: 232
    Width: 152 mm
    Height: 229 mm
    Thickness: 25 mm
    Weight: 499 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780820333342
    ISBN 10: 0820333344
    Classifications

    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T5.2
    BIC subject category V2: HBTB
    BIC E4L: HIS
    BIC geographical qualifier V2: 1FPC
    BIC subject category V2: HBJF
    BISAC V2.8: HIS008000, POL011000, HIS037080
    LC subject heading: ,
    DC22: 951.0072
    LC subject heading: , ,
    Publisher
    University of Georgia Press
    Imprint name
    University of Georgia Press
    Publication date
    15 June 2009
    Publication City/Country
    Georgia
    Author Information
    Charles Horner, a student of China for four decades, is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute.
    Review quote
    "The book is clear, engagingly written, and quite original, combining an overview of Western scholarship, some Chinese scholarship, and a critique of twentieth-century Chinese culture to argue the prospects of China's completed modernization and the challenges it poses for the state and the military." - Pamela Kyle Crossley, Robert 1932 and Barbara Black Professor of History, Dartmouth College"
    Flap copy
    China's sense of today and its view of tomorrow are both rooted in the past--and we need to understand that connection, says China scholar Charles Horner. In Rising China and Its Postmodern Fate, Horner offers a new interpretation of how China's changed view of its modern historical experience has also changed China's understanding of its long intellectual and cultural tradition. Spirited reevaluations of history, strategy, commerce, and literature are cooperating--and competing--to define the future.

    The capstone of modern China was the founding of the People's Republic in 1949 and its rejection of Confucianism, capitalism, and modernity. Yet today's rising China retains few vestiges of what Mao wrought. What then, Horner asks, is post-Mao, postmodern China? Where did it come from? How did it get here? Where is it going?

    Contemporary views of the great periods in Chinese history are having a significant influence on the development of rising China's national strategy, says Horner. He looks at the revival of interest in, and changing interpretations of, three dynasties--the Yuan (1280-1368), the Ming (1368-1644), and the Qing (1644-1912)--that, together with the People's Republic of China, provide examples of great power success.

    The future of every major country is now connected to China's, and this book explains how China, now seeing itself as the complex and thriving result of the old and the new, is poised to change the world.