Remus

Remus : A Roman Myth

By (author) T. P. Wiseman

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Romulus founded Rome - but why does the myth give him a twin brother Remus, who is killed at the moment of the foundation? This mysterious legend has been oddly neglected. Roman historians ignore it as irrelevant to real history; students of myth concentrate on the more glamorous mythology of Greece. In this book, Professor Wiseman provides, for the first time, a detailed analysis of all the variants of the story, and a historical explanation for its origin and development. His conclusions offer important new insights, both into the history and ideology of pre-imperial Rome and into the methods and motives of myth-creation in a non-literate society. In the richly unfamiliar Rome of Pan, Hermes and Circe the witch-goddess, where a general grows miraculous horns and prophets demand human sacrifice, Remus stands for the unequal struggle of the many against the powerful few.

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  • Paperback | 260 pages
  • 140 x 214 x 18mm | 358.34g
  • 19 Nov 1995
  • CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
  • Cambridge
  • English
  • 16 b/w illus. 4 maps
  • 0521483662
  • 9780521483667
  • 591,217

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Review quote

"...a pleasure to read and will lead, one hopes, to renewed interest in the myth of the foundation of Rome and its central characters." Religious Studies Review "[This] wonderfully clear narrative demonstrates the best of contempoary scholarship..." Choice "...[a] wild and wonderful book." Times Literary Supplement "...Wiseman packs several centuries worth of primary sources and scholarship into a delightfully written argument. Wiseman's Remus is required reading for anyone with an interest in Roman mythology, history, or literature." Cynthia Bannon, Folklore Forum

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Back cover copy

Professor Wiseman provides, for the first time, a detailed analysis of all the variants of the story, and a historical explanation for its origin and development. His conclusions offer important new insights, both into history and ideology of pre-imperial Rome and into the methods and motives of myth-creation in a non-literate society.

show more