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    Remnants of Auschwitz: The Witness and the Archive (Paperback) By (author) Giorgio Agamben, Translated by Daniel Heller-Roazen

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    DescriptionIn this book the Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben looks closely at the literature of the survivors of Auschwitz, probing the philosophical and ethical questions raised by their testimony."In its form, this book is a kind of perpetual commentary on testimony. It did not seem possible to proceed otherwise. At a certain point, it became clear that testimony contained at its core an essential lacuna; in other words, the survivors bore witness to something it is impossible to bear witness to. As a consequence, commenting on survivors' testimony necessarily meant interrogating this lacuna or, more precisely, attempting to listen to it. Listening to something absent did not prove fruitless work for this author. Above all, it made it necessary to clear away almost all the doctrines that, since Auschwitz, have been advanced in the name of ethics."--Giorgio Agamben


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  • Full bibliographic data for Remnants of Auschwitz

    Title
    Remnants of Auschwitz
    Subtitle
    The Witness and the Archive
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Giorgio Agamben, Translated by Daniel Heller-Roazen
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 176
    Width: 152 mm
    Height: 224 mm
    Thickness: 16 mm
    Weight: 299 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9781890951177
    ISBN 10: 189095117X
    Classifications

    B&T Book Type: NF
    BIC subject category V2: HBWQ
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T5.2
    BIC E4L: HIS
    BIC time period qualifier V2: 3JJP
    BIC subject category V2: DNF, HBJD, DSB, HBTZ1
    BIC geographical qualifier V2: 1DVP
    BIC subject category V2: HPQ
    BISAC V2.8: PHI000000
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 01
    B&T Modifier: Geographic Designator: 05
    Libri: I-HP
    Ingram Subject Code: HP
    B&T General Subject: 431
    Ingram Theme: TOPC/HOLOCT
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 25570
    DC22: 940.53/18, 940.5318
    B&T Approval Code: A14777500
    B&T Merchandise Category: UP
    BISAC V2.8: HIS043000
    B&T Approval Code: A14060000
    BIC subject category V2: 3JJP, 1DVP
    LC subject heading:
    DC21: 809.93358
    LC subject heading: ,
    LC classification: D804.195 .A53 2000
    Thema V1.0: QDTQ, DNL, NHTZ1, NHWR7, NHD, NHWL, DSB
    Edition statement
    Revised ed.
    Illustrations note
    Ill.
    Publisher
    ZONE BOOKS
    Imprint name
    ZONE BOOKS
    Publication date
    04 October 2002
    Publication City/Country
    New York
    Author Information
    Giorgio Agamben is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Venice. He is the author of Profanations (2007), Remnants of Auschwitz: The Witness and the Archive (2002), both published by Zone Books, and other books. Daniel Heller-Roazen is the Arthur W. Marks '19 Professor of Comparative Literature and the Council of the Humanities at Princeton University. He is the author of Echolalias: On the Forgetting of Language; The Inner Touch: Archaeology of a Sensation; The Enemy of All: Piracy and the Law of Nations; and The Fifth Hammer: Pythagoras and the Disharmony of the World, all published by Zone Books.
    Review quote
    "Agamben's moving text on the Nazi death camps asks what happens to speech when the deracinated subject speaks. Although some say that Auschwitz makes witnessing impossible, Agamben shows how the one who speaks bears this impossibility within his own speech, bordering the human and the inhuman. Agamben probes for us the condition of speech at the limit of the human, evoking the horror and the near unspeakability of the inhuman as it witnesses in language its own undoing." Judith Butler, Maxine Elliot Professor of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature, University of California, Berkeley