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    Religion in the Prehispanic Southwest (Archaeology of Religion (Hardcover)) (Hardback) Edited by Christine S. Vanpool, Edited by Todd L. Vanpool, Edited by David A. Phillips

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    DescriptionReligion mattered to the prehistoric Southwestern people, just as it matters to their descendents today. Examining the role of religion can help to explain architecture, pottery, agriculture, even commerce. But archaeologists have only recently developed the theoretical and methodological tools with which to study this topic. Religion in the Prehispanic Southwest marks the first book-length study of prehistoric religion in the region. Drawing on a rich array of empirical approaches, the contributors show the importance of understanding beliefs and ritual for a range of time periods and southwestern societies. For professional and avocational archaeologists, for religion scholars and students, Religion in the Prehispanic Southwest represents an important contribution.


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    Title
    Religion in the Prehispanic Southwest
    Authors and contributors
    Edited by Christine S. Vanpool, Edited by Todd L. Vanpool, Edited by David A. Phillips
    Physical properties
    Format: Hardback
    Number of pages: 288
    Width: 155 mm
    Height: 231 mm
    Thickness: 23 mm
    Weight: 499 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780759109667
    ISBN 10: 0759109664
    Classifications

    B&T Book Type: NF
    BIC E4L: REL
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T6.0
    B&T Merchandise Category: TXT
    B&T General Subject: 750
    Ingram Subject Code: AH
    BIC subject category V2: HRAX
    BISAC V2.8: SOC003000
    BIC geographical qualifier V2: 1KL
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 15820
    BISAC Merchandising Theme: ET150
    Ingram Theme: ETHN/NATAMR
    BISAC V2.8: REL072000
    Ingram Theme: CULT/SOUTHW
    BISAC V2.8: SOC002000, HIS028000
    Ingram Theme: CHRN/PREHIS
    BISAC V2.8: SOC021000
    LC subject heading: ,
    BIC subject category V2: 1KL
    DC22: 200.98
    LC subject heading:
    BISAC V2.8: REL033000
    DC22: 299.7/99
    LC classification: E78.S7 R45 2006
    LC subject heading: , ,
    DC22: 299.799
    LC subject heading: , ,
    BISAC region code: 4.0.1.6.0.0.0
    Thema V1.0: QRAX, NHTB, NHK, JBSL11, QRA
    Thema geographical qualifier V1.0: 1KL
    Publisher
    AltaMira Press,U.S.
    Imprint name
    AltaMira Press,U.S.
    Publication date
    30 January 2007
    Publication City/Country
    California
    Author Information
    Christine S. VanPool is visiting assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Missouri. Todd VanPool is assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Missouri. David A. Phillips, Jr. is curator of archaeology at the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology and an adjunct associate professor of anthropology at the University of New Mexico.
    Review quote
    This volume is a welcome addition to archaeological study in the American Southwest. Papers explore a range of interesting topics including Katsina religion, iconography, ballgames, ceremonial architecture, and religious conflict. The editors should becommended for gathering such an up-to-date and balanced mix of Puebloan and Nonpuebloan traditions. Their choices reflect the growing and exciting innovations in the archaeology of religion in the region... -- William Walker, New Mexico State University Advanced scholars will find it a challenging and stimulating book...larger research libraries should have a copy, as there are excellent arguments and data sets included. Summing Up: Recommended. CHOICE, January 2008 As is true of all societies, religion was and is a major organizing principle among Southwestern native cultures. Over the last century or more, the religions of this area have been central to many ethnological studies. But a specific focus on religion, especially in a cross cultural context, is quite rare in archaeology. When dealing with Southwestern religion, archaeologists usually content themselves with a description of ?ceremonialv artifacts, structures, etc., providing little interpretation. Editors VanPool, VanPool and Phillips challenge the chapter authors of ?Religion in the Prehispanic Southwestv to speculate as to the meaning of the artifactual data. The result is a richly insightful and authoritative book, describing prehistoric Southwestern religions especially in their interaction with the high cultures to the south. This book is a must read for anyone interested in the native religions, past and present, of the Southwest.. -- Carrol L. Riley, Author of ?Becoming Aztlan: Mesoamerican Influence in the Greater Southwest, AD 1200-1500,v (2005). Distg. Professor Emeritu This volume is a welcome addition to archaeological study in the American Southwest. Papers explore a range of interesting topics including Katsina religion, iconography, ballgames, ceremonial architecture, and religious conflict. The editors should be commended for gathering such an up-to-date and balanced mix of Puebloan and Nonpuebloan traditions. Their choices reflect the growing and exciting innovations in the archaeology of religion in the region. -- William Walker, New Mexico State University As is true of all societies, religion was and is a major organizing principle among Southwestern native cultures. Over the last century or more, the religions of this area have been central to many ethnological studies. But a specific focus on religion, especially in a cross cultural context, is quite rare in archaeology. When dealing with Southwestern religion, archaeologists usually content themselves with a description of "ceremonialv artifacts, structures, etc., providing little interpretation. Editors VanPool, VanPool and Phillips challenge the chapter authors of "Religion in the Prehispanic Southwestv to speculate as to the meaning of the artifactual data. The result is a richly insightful and authoritative book, describing prehistoric Southwestern religions especially in their interaction with the high cultures to the south. This book is a "must read" for anyone interested in the native religions, past and present, of the Southwest. -- Carrol L. Riley, Author of "Becoming Aztlan: Mesoamerican Influence in the Greater Southwest, AD 1200-1500,v (2005). Distg. Professor Emeritus,
    Table of contents
    1 Introduction: Archaeology and Religion 2 The Horned Serpent Tradition in the North American Southwest 3 Religious Behavior in the Post-Chaco Years 4 New Perspectives on an Ancient Religion: Katsina Ritual and the Archaeological Record 5 Icons and Ethnicity: Hopi Painted Pottery and Murals 6 Gathering Places and Bounded Places: The Religious Significance of Plaza-oriented Communities in the Northern Rio Grande, New Mexico 7 Iikaah: Chaco Sacred Schematics 8 Guanacos, Symbolism, and Religion During The Hohokam Pre-Classic 9 Elevated Spaces: Exploring the Symbolic at Cerros de Trincheras 10 Toloatzin And Shamanic Journeys: Exploring The Ritual Role of Sacred Datura In The Prehistoric Southwest 11 Precolumbian Venus: Celestial Twin and Icon of Duality 12 Religion and the Mesoamerican Ballgame in the Casas Grandes Region of Northern Mexico 13 Emergent Complexity, Ritual Practices, and Mortuary Behavior at Paquime, Chihuahua, Mexico 14 The Salado and Casas Grandes Phenomena: Evidence for a Religious Schism in the Greater Southwest