Reason, Faith, and Revolution
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Reason, Faith, and Revolution : Reflections on the God Debate

By (author) Terry Eagleton

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Terry Eagleton's witty and polemical Reason, Faith, and Revolution is bound to cause a stir among scientists, theologians, people of faith and people of no faith, as well as general readers eager to understand the God Debate. On the one hand, Eagleton demolishes what he calls the "superstitious" view of God held by most atheists and agnostics and offers in its place a revolutionary account of the Christian Gospel. On the other hand, he launches a stinging assault on the betrayal of this revolution by institutional Christianity. There is little joy here, then, either for the anti-God brigade-Richard Dawkins and Christopher Hitchens in particular-nor for many conventional believers. Instead, Eagleton offers his own vibrant account of religion and politics in a book that ranges from the Holy Spirit to the recent history of the Middle East, from Thomas Aquinas to the Twin Towers.

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  • Paperback | 200 pages
  • 140 x 210 x 12mm | 258.55g
  • 06 Apr 2010
  • Yale University Press
  • New Haven
  • English
  • 030016453X
  • 9780300164534
  • 41,977

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Author Information

Terry Eagleton is Distinguished Professor of English Literature at the University of Lancaster, England, and Professor of Cultural Theory at the National University of Ireland, Galway. He is also Distinguished Visiting Professor at the University of Notre Dame. Eagleton is also the author of On Evil, published by Yale University Press.

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Review quote

"'Terry Eagleton's intervention into the debate sparked by Richard Dawkins's The God Delusion is, by turns, thought-provoking, infuriating, inspiring and very, very funny.' London Review of Books 'a gloriously rumbustious counter-blast to Dawkinsite atheism... paradoxes sparkle throughout this coruscatingly brilliant polemic... This is, then, a demolition job which is both logically devastating and a magnificently whirling philippic... Much of what it says is too true.' Paul Vallely, The Independent 'Eagleton's book began as a series of lectures delivered at Yale University. They must have been a riot... He's fantastically rude all round, about 'Ditchkins', about religion itself... It's terrific polemic.' Melanie McDonagh, Evening Standard"

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Customer reviews

Anti "Ditchkins"

Eagleton seems to be annoyed by the fact that Hitchens was a gifted orator and Dawkins claims to find happiness in science and facts. Much energy is spent giving negative personal statements on "Ditchins", a term obviously ment for ridicule. Eagleton is also trying to construct a revolutionary Christianity by removing most of the negative aspects of religion, the ones that "Ditchins" focuses on, using only the "cozy" parts of the Bible, those that we unbelievers call human values. If Eagleton had lived in the old Greece, he would probably also rejected Socrates on basis of his eloquence.show more
by Finn Jacobsen