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    Pretty Straight Guys (Hardback) By (author) Nick Cohen

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    DescriptionNick Cohen explores the feeling of angry impotence which has swept modern Britain during the Labour administration. The text shifts focus away from Westminster and into the more diverse and unexpected territories of New Labour influence, from America to India. Based on original research and interviews - and an instinct for stories other journalists ignore - this book combines contemporary history with satire and polemic.


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  • Full bibliographic data for Pretty Straight Guys

    Title
    Pretty Straight Guys
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Nick Cohen
    Physical properties
    Format: Hardback
    Number of pages: 324
    Width: 142 mm
    Height: 224 mm
    Weight: 455 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780571220038
    ISBN 10: 0571220037
    Classifications

    BIC E4L: POL
    BIC time period qualifier V2: 3JM
    BIC subject category V2: HBLW3, HBJD1
    BIC geographical qualifier V2: 1DBKE
    BIC time period qualifier V2: 3JJPR
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T7.2
    LC classification: DA589.7
    BIC subject category V2: JPFF
    BISAC V2.8: HIS015000
    BIC subject category V2: JPL
    LC subject heading:
    BISAC V2.8: POL015000, HIS037070, POL005000
    DC21: 324.24107
    Thema V1.0: JPL, NHD, JPFF
    Publisher
    FABER & FABER
    Imprint name
    FABER & FABER
    Publication date
    04 September 2003
    Publication City/Country
    London
    Review text
    The title of Nick Cohen's enthusiastic demolition of New Labour is taken from Tony Blair's contention that he was 'a pretty straight guy' in the aftermath of the Ecclestone affair (when Formula 1 chief Bernie Ecclestone donated a large sum of money to New Labour, and, in a strange coincidence, F1 was excluded from a ban on tobacco advertising in sport). Cohen amply demonstrates (with a certain amount of glee) that New Labour are anything but Pretty Straight Guys, and his book is an at times rather depressing account of disasters (the Dome), dubious dealings with Murdoch and the Hinduja brothers, and at times breathtakingly murky morality. Pretty Straight Guys is a searing critique of the Labour party (and the Britain) that Blair and co. have attempted to create, written with great passion and cynicism. Cohen offers no remedies to the current crisis in politics, but the reader will be hard-pressed to find a more incisive diagnosis of the ills of modern Britain. (Kirkus UK)