In Praise of Older Women: The Amorous Recollections of Andras Vajda

In Praise of Older Women: The Amorous Recollections of Andras Vajda

Paperback

By (author) Stephen Vizinczey

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  • Publisher: PENGUIN CLASSICS
  • Format: Paperback | 256 pages
  • Dimensions: 128mm x 192mm x 20mm | 181g
  • Publication date: 1 June 2010
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 0141192062
  • ISBN 13: 9780141192062
  • Sales rank: 32,969

Product description

Stephen Vizinczey's remarkable, acclaimed worldwide bestseller "In Praise of Older Women" is published in Penguin Modern Classics. 'I am not an expert on sex, but I was a good student of the women I loved, and I'll try to recall those happy and unhappy experiences which, I believe, made a man out of me,' writes the narrator of this novel. Originally published by the author himself in 1965, "In Praise of Older Women" became an international bestseller and renowned classic, and its title is now part of the language. Stephen Vizinczey (b.1933) is a poet, playwright and novelist, best known for his novels "In Praise of Older Women" (1965) and "An Innocent Millionaire" (1983). Born in Hungary, he was only two years old when his father was assassinated by the Nazis, and later also lost his uncle to the communists. Having studied under George Lukacs at the University of Budapest, he graduated from the city's Academy of Theatre and Film Arts in 1956. He took part in the Hungarian Revolution of 1956, and later emigrated to Canada, speaking only fifty words of English. He learned the language while writing scripts for the National Film Board of Canada; subsequently, he founded and edited a literary-political magazine, "Exchange", and joined CBC/Radio Canada as a writer and producer. In 1966 he moved to London where he still lives. If you enjoyed "In Praise of Older Women", you might like Anais Nin's "Delta of Venus", also available in "Penguin Classics". "A tender and beautiful book." ("Michael Frayn"). "You cannot put down: witty, moving and it's all about sex. Truly original." (Margaret Drabble, author of "The Needle's Eye"). "A masterpiece...dazzling...like all great novels, it shows the truth about life." (Pierre Lepape, Le Monde).

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Author information

Stephen Vizinczey is a poet, playwright and novelist, best known for his novels In Praise of Older Women (1965) and An Innocent Millionaire (1983). Born in Hungary in 1933, he was only two years old when his father was assassinated by the Nazis, and later also lost his uncle to the communists. Having studied under George Lukacs at the University of Budapest, he graduated from the city's Academy of Theatre and Film Arts in 1956. He took part in the Hungarian Revolution of 1956, and later emigrated to Canada, speaking only 50 words of English. He learned the language while writing scripts for the National Film Board of Canada; subsequently, he founded and edited a literary-political magazine, Exchange, and joined CBC/Radio Canada as a writer and producer. In 1966 he moved to London where he still lives.

Review quote

A funny novel about sex, or rather (which is rarer) a novel which is funny as well as touching about sex ... elegant, exact and melodious -- Isabel Quigly Sunday Telegraph The delicious adventures of a young Casanova who appreciates maturity while acquiring it himself. In turn naive, sophisticated, arrogant, disarming, the narrator woos his women and his tale wins the reader -- Polly Devlin Vogue Spectacular! It's always a risky business, re-reading a book which was important to you in your adolescence. But re-reading this one, I was struck by a great deal that I missed before ... a much richer book than I remembered. Immensely pleasurable. -- A. A. Gill (2010) A skinny book with a funny name, a title I didn't know, by an author I'd never heard of, which turns out to be just wonderful -- John Self (2010) theasylum.wordpress.com In Praise of Older Women is as singular as a lemon tree or a giraffe or a ripe pear.In a voice free of vanity and subterfuge, the writer tells a story of the worst of times, and the ever-shifting truths about girls and youths, men and women and their sexual connections--and mis-connections--in a way that is always luminous and enlightening. Paula Fox