The Politics of Down Syndrome

The Politics of Down Syndrome

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Description

Are we a more accepting society than ever before? Is there no longer a them and us division between the disabled and everybody else? The Politics of Down Syndrome looks at how we got to where we are today, from the racist roots of its identification to the rising number of abortions today. Down syndrome is the most common syndrome in the world, shared by all classes and races, yet it's one we rarely address our feelings about, head on. This book, although direct and questioning, takes a positive view about where we go from here and the opportunity for society to fully enjoy the benefits of being inclusive.

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Product details

  • Paperback | 89 pages
  • 138 x 208 x 10mm | 99.79g
  • John Hunt Publishing
  • Zero Books
  • Ropley, United Kingdom
  • English
  • 1846946131
  • 9781846946134
  • 79,785

About Kieron Smith

Kieron is a non-executive Director of Down Syndrome Education International the world's leading academic research based Down syndrome charity (www.dseinternational.org). He is also father to Tanzie (born 2004) who has Down syndrome and was involved in the incident with the comedian Frankie Boyle, with his wife Sharon Smith, (http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2010/apr/08/frankie-boyle-downs-syndrome). Kieron is a professional bookseller, ex Managing Director of The Book Depository, the UK's largest specialist online bookshop, he has previously worked throughout the trade, including at Waterstones and WHSmith Retail. Since 2014 he has been MD of The Best Little Bookshop http://www.bestlittlebookshop.com/.

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Review quote

This is a timely book that is as important as it is unusual. The 'problems' of people with Down syndrome are often discussed - less so those of the world they find themselves in. Political decisions that profoundly affect (or even prematurely end) the lives of people with Down syndrome are taken by policymakers with little knowledge of the condition and almost always without asking people with Down syndrome what they think. This book highlights many of the prejudices behind these decisions, and many of their consequences. In so doing, it provokes a debate that is urgently needed - one that is not just about Down syndrome but about human differences, human diversity and the defence of individual human rights. (Frank Buckley, CEO Down Syndrome Education International) Fascinating - at last a concise, well written examination of Down's syndrome which not only presents a historical perspective and political analysis but has the added advantage of deriving from personal experience. (Andy Merriman, Writer and broadcaster, co-author of BBC Radio 4 drama 'Minor Adjustment')

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Customer reviews

Kieron has bravely and eloquently taken on a subject that most people never even think about until it affects them. It is this ignorance that has spawned the most upsetting and distressing discrimination against people with Down's Syndrome. Maybe things are a bit better than they were a while ago, but there is still a long road to travel before we can say we're a fully inclusive society. I personally think it's 'medicine' that needs to change, rather than politics having had years of dealing with doctors for my youngest sibling who is, firstly a person, not a 'sufferer' of a 'syndrome'. His book describes how we as a society have created a terrible assumption that Down's = suffering, expense, low-life expectancy, early death, unemployment etc etc and we routinely 'screen' expectant mothers sending a 'very strong signal from the very start, principally that Down syndrome is such a serious condition that a national screening program is necessary; which is the case in the UK and of many other Western countries.' A person with Down's syndrome is a person, not an expense on society's budget. I applaud Kieron's worthy writing.show more
by Miss Mary English