Please Look After Mom

Please Look After Mom

Paperback Vintage Contemporaries

By (author) Kyung-Sook Shin, By (author) Kyong-Suk Sin

USD$12.30
List price $14.95
You save $2.65 17% off

Free delivery worldwide
Available
Dispatched in 3 business days
When will my order arrive?

  • Publisher: Random House Inc
  • Format: Paperback | 272 pages
  • Dimensions: 137mm x 201mm x 25mm | 272g
  • Publication date: 3 April 2012
  • Publication City/Country: New York
  • ISBN 10: 0307739511
  • ISBN 13: 9780307739513
  • Edition statement: Reprint
  • Sales rank: 206,491

Product description

MAN ASIAN LITERARY PRIZE WINNERWhen sixty-nine-year-old So-nyo is separated from her husband among the crowds of the Seoul subway station, her family begins a desperate search to find her. Yet as long-held secrets and private sorrows begin to reveal themselves, they are forced to wonder: how well did they actually know the woman they called Mom? Told through the piercing voices and urgent perspectives of a daughter, son, husband, and mother, "Please Look After Mom" is at once an authentic picture of contemporary life in Korea and a universal story of family love.

Other people who viewed this bought:

Showing items 1 to 10 of 10

Other books in this category

Showing items 1 to 11 of 11
Categories:

Author information

Kyung-Sook Shin is the author of numerous works of fiction and is one of South Korea's most widely read and acclaimed novelists. She was the first woman to be awarded the Man Asian Literary Prize (for "Please Look After Mom"), and she has also been honored with the Manhae Literature Prize, the Dong-in Literature Prize, and the Yi Sang Literary Prize, as well as France's Prix de l'InaperCu. "Please Look After Mom" is her first book to appear in English. It will be published in twenty-nine countries and has sold over 2 million copies in South Korea alone.

Review quote

"Shin's novel, her first to be translated into English, embraces multiplicity. It is told from the perspectives of four members of [a missing woman's] family; from their memories emerges a portrait of a heroically industrious woman. [Mom] runs their rural home 'like a factory, ' sews and knits and tills the fields. The family is poor, but she sees to it that her children's bellies are filled . . . Only after her children grow up and leave their home in [the countryside] does Mom's strength and purposefulness begin to flag. Questions punctuate [the] narrative and lead to a cascade of revelations, discoveries that come gradually. . . Shin's prose, intimate, and hauntingly spare, powerfully conveys grief's bewildering immediacy. [Daughter] Chi-hon's voice is the novel's most distinct, but Father's is the most devastating. . . . And yet this book isn't as interested in emotional manipulation as it is in the invisible chasms that open up between people who know one another best. . . . A raw