Plays: "Ajax", "Electra", "Oedipus Tyrannus" v. 1

Plays: "Ajax", "Electra", "Oedipus Tyrannus" v. 1

Hardback Loeb Classical Library Language: English / Greek, Ancient (to 1453)

By (author) Sophocles, Edited by Hugh Lloyd-Jones, Translated by Hugh Lloyd-Jones

$21.93
List price $26.63
You save $4.70 17% off

Free delivery worldwide
Available
Dispatched in 3 business days
When will my order arrive?

  • Publisher: LOEB
  • Format: Hardback | 492 pages
  • Language: English / Greek, Ancient (to 1453)
  • Dimensions: 110mm x 156mm x 28mm | 322g
  • Publication date: 1 December 1994
  • Publication City/Country: Cambridge, Mass
  • ISBN 10: 0674995570
  • ISBN 13: 9780674995574
  • Sales rank: 165,605

Product description

Sophocles (497/6 406 BCE), considered one of the world s greatest poets, forged tragedy from the heroic excess of myth and legend. Seven complete plays are extant, including Oedipus Tyrannus, Ajax, Antigone, and Philoctetes. Among many fragments that also survive is a substantial portion of the satyr drama The Searchers.

Other people who viewed this bought:

Showing items 1 to 10 of 10

Other books in this category

Showing items 1 to 11 of 11
Categories:

Review quote

Sir Hugh is providing, that is, what Nabokov, in rendering "Eugene Onegin", called a metaphrase--a scrupulous, bare explanation of the original...Plainspun prose indeed, but attractively diaphanous. We can be pretty sure that these were the exact lexical intentions of Sophocles...Reading the seven Sophocles plays in the new Loeb version only confirms his impenetrable greatness.--Donald Lyons "New Criterion "

Back cover copy

Sophocles (497/6-406 BC), the second of the three great tragedians of Athens and by common consent one of the world's greatest poets, wrote more than 120 plays. Only seven of these survive complete, but we have a wealth of fragments, from which much can be learned about Sophocles' language and dramatic art. This volume presents a collection of all the major fragments, ranging in length from two lines to a very substantial portion of the satyr play The Searchers. Prefatory notes provide frameworks for the fragments of the known plays. Many of the Sophoclean fragments were preserved by quotation in other authors; others, some of considerable size, are known to us from papyri discovered during the past century. Among the lost plays of which we have large fragments, The Searchers shows the god Hermes, soon after his birth, playing an amusing trick on his brother Apollo; Inachus portrays Zeus coming to Argos to seduce Io, the daughter of its king; and Niobe tells how Apollo and his sister Artemis punish Niobe for a slight upon their mother by killing her twelve children. Throughout the volume, as in the extant plays, we see Sophocles drawing his subjects from heroic legend.