Playing with Water

Playing with Water : Passion and Solitude on a Philippine Island


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James Hamilton-Paterson spends a third of each year on an otherwise uninhabited Philippine island, spear-fishing for survival. Playing with Water tells us why he does. Beyond that, it gives an account of life in that class-bound country as a whole. For it is in places like this rather than Manila of the international news reports that the underlying political and cultural reality of the Philippines may be seen.

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  • Paperback | 288 pages
  • 140 x 214 x 24mm | 399.99g
  • New Amsterdam Books
  • New YorkUnited States
  • English
  • Reprint
  • 0941533824
  • 9780941533829
  • 224,732

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...a work of such genuine commitment, balanced perception and responsive passion that it will certainly be condemned to become a classic. The New York Times A classic travel book...entirely original: at once astringently and gorgeously written... Andrew Harvey Unforgetable. The Philippine landscape and these remote islanders are crystalline and at the same time mysterious; the writing itself supurb. Ronald Blythe

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About James Hamilton-Paterson

James Hamilton-Paterson is generally known as a commentator on the Philippines, where he has lived on and off since 1979. He is one of the most reclusive of British literary exiles, sharing his time between Austria, where he moved recently from Italy, and the Philippines. His work defies accurate definition, containing elements of travel writing, autobiography, fiction and science. Hamilton-Paterson was born on November 6, 1941 in London, England. He was educated at Windlesham House, Sussex, Bickley Hall, Kent, King's School, Canterbury, and Exeter College, Oxford. Some of his other books include A very personal war: the story of Cornelius Hawkridge (1971), The View from Mount Dog (1987), and Gerontius (1989).

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