Planet Google
39%
off

Planet Google : How One Company is Transforming Our Lives

  • Paperback
By (author)

US$8.61US$14.22

You save US$5.61

Free delivery worldwide

Available
Dispatched from the UK in 1 business day

When will my order arrive?

Description

Google has a dream: to manage the entire world's information. The company wants to access every single bit of it it can - from news, to financial and historical data; from the content of books, films and TV, to a complete record of the Earth's surface; and most controversially, the statistics of our personal lives - from what we have been reading, to who we have been talking to, to what we have been buying and where. If information is power, then Google are a force to be reckoned with. Google is almost evangelical in its belief that by realizing its vision it will be fulfilling the promise of computing, as envisioned by its founding developers. Others, however, are increasingly alarmed by the invasion of privacy that Google's vision might both entail and enable. With unprecedented access to the key players at Google HQ, Planet Google is a revelatory - and often alarming - behind-the-scenes investigation into Google's plans, and the implications of its mission for our future.

show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 288 pages
  • 129 x 198 x 21mm | 274g
  • ATLANTIC BOOKS
  • London, United Kingdom
  • Main
  • 1843549824
  • 9781843549826
  • 649,874

About Randall E. Stross

Randall E. Stross is one of the most respected reporters covering Silicon Valley. He is the New York Times columnist from the Valley, and teaches business history at San Jose State University. He is the author of several previous books, including The Microsoft Way, Steve Jobs and the NeXT Big Thing, and eBoys: The First Inside Account of Venture Capitalists at Work. He lives in Menlo Park, California.

show more

Review quote

"'Sharp-eyed... A restless examination of Google's strengths and weaknesses, and contradictions... The company that emerges from this book is a more rickety and interesting enterprise than non-geeks might imagine.' Guardian"

show more