Place, Art, and Self

Place, Art, and Self

By (author) Yi-Fu Tuan

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"What do place, art, and self have in common? To what extent do place and art define who we are?" In Place, Art, and Self, the renowned humanistic geographer Yi-Fu Tuan tackles this large question in a small, accessible, beautifully illustrated book. Through memoir and the insights gained from a peripatetic life as an international scholar, Tuan explores the idea of attachment through place and art and the role of attachment in shaping, defining, and expanding the self. Inasmuch as a place contains sources of "nurture and identity," Tuan writes, so, too, does a painting, photograph, poem, novel, motion picture, dance, or piece of music. "The arts are likewise emblematic and revelatory. The ones I strongly like and dislike expose me, make me feel naked before the public eye, which is why I am guarded in my confessions." Drawing from a lifetime spent thinking and writing about the connection between geography and our spiritual needs, Tuan presents a compelling and meditative foray into how place, home, and homelessness condition us as humans. Complementing his essay is a gallery of fine-art black-and-white and color plates by four emerging contemporary photographers, whose work accords with Tuan's message.

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  • Paperback | 96 pages
  • 148 x 152 x 8mm | 222.26g
  • 30 Sep 2004
  • University of Virginia Press
  • Charlottesville
  • English
  • New.
  • 35 colour illustrations
  • 1930066244
  • 9781930066243
  • 452,901

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Author Information

Yi-Fu Tuan is the John. K. Wright Professor of Geography Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and the author of more than a dozen books, including Escapism and Who Am I?.

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Review quote

"Tuan gives us a way of seeing the world that illuminates the relatedness of its parts - and, in doing so, he makes geography absolutely essential." - J. Nicholas Entrikin, University of California, Los Angeles"

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