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    The Pity of War (Paperback) By (author) Niall Ferguson

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    DescriptionNiall Ferguson's "The Pity of War: 1914-1918" is a provocative and boldly-conceived history that explodes many of the myths surrounding the First World War. The First World War killed around eight million men and bled Europe dry. In this provocative book Niall Ferguson asks: was the sacrifice worth it? Was it all really an inevitable cataclysm and were the Germans a genuine threat? Was the war, as is often asserted, greeted with popular enthusiasm? Why did men keep on fighting when conditions were so wretched? Was there in fact a death wish abroad, driving soldiers to their own destruction? The war, he argues, was a disaster - but not for the reasons we think. Far worse than a tragedy, it was the greatest error of modern history. "Must take a permanent place at the top of the War's historiography. It is one of the very few books whose own scale matches that of the events it describes". (Alan Clark, "Daily Telegraph"). "Possibly the most important book to appear in years both on the origins of the First World War...Ferguson can confidently claim to have inherited A. J. P. Taylor's mantle". (Paul Kennedy, "New York Review of Books"). "At one massive stroke, Niall Ferguson has transformed the intellectual landscape". (Economist Niall). Ferguson is one of Britain's most renowned historians. He is Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History at Harvard University, a Senior Research Fellow of Jesus College, Oxford and a Senior Fellow of the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. He is the bestselling author of "Civilization", "The House of Rothschild", "The Pity of War", "The Cash Nexus", "Empire", "Colossus", "The War of the World" and "The Ascent of Money".


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  • Full bibliographic data for The Pity of War

    Title
    The Pity of War
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Niall Ferguson
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 672
    Width: 129 mm
    Height: 198 mm
    Thickness: 30 mm
    Weight: 505 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780140275230
    ISBN 10: 0140275231
    Classifications

    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 15500
    BIC subject category V2: HBG
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T5.4
    BIC E4L: HIS
    BIC subject category V2: HBJD
    LC subject heading:
    BIC subject category V2: HBWN
    DC21: 940.3
    BISAC V2.8: HIS027090
    Thema V1.0: NHB, NHWR5, NHD
    Illustrations note
    portraits
    Publisher
    Penguin Books Ltd
    Imprint name
    Penguin Books Ltd
    Publication date
    30 September 1999
    Publication City/Country
    London
    Author Information
    Niall Ferguson is Herzog Professor of Financial History at the Stern School of Business, New York University, Visiting Professor of History, Oxford University and Senior Research Fellow, Jesus College, Oxford. His other books for Penguin include Empire, The Cash Nexus, Colossus, The War of the World, Virtual History, High Financier and Civilization.
    Review quote
    The most challenging and provocative analysis of the First World War to date -- Ian Kershaw Must take a permanent place at the top of the War's historiography. It is one of the very few books whose own scale matches that of the events it describes -- Alan Clark Daily Telegraph Brilliant and stimulating ... radical, readable and convincing The Times Possibly the most important book to appear in years both on the origins of the First World War ... Ferguson can confidently claim to have inherited A. J. P. Taylor's mantle -- Paul Kennedy New York Review of Books At one massive stroke, Niall Ferguson has transformed the intellectual landscape Economist
    Review text
    As the 20th century draws to a close, Ferguson (Modern History/Oxford Univ.; The House of Rothschild, 1998) renders a brilliant reassessment of one of the century's most far-reaching and tragic wars, the First World War. Ferguson unpacks the terror and tragedy of the war while demolishing widely held beliefs about it. One of these was that the war was an inevitable result of regnant imperialism and militarism: Ferguson argues trenchantly that the trend in Europe in 1914 was away from militarism and that German feedings of growing military weakness started the war. Ferguson also contends that equivocal British policies in Europe and failure to maintain a credible army to back up its continental commitments, among other factors, led Britain needlessly to transform a continental conflict into a world war. Ferguson also establishes that until the collapse of the German leadership's morale in late 1918, Germany was actually winning the war by any important measure - though vastly economically inferior to Britain, Germany had defeated three of the Entente powers and came close to defeating France, Britain, and Italy. Moreover, Ferguson contends, because of the tactical excellence of its armies, Germany was far more efficient then the Entente powers at inflicting casualties on its enemies until the very end of its failed 1918 offensive. The author also attacks the common view that the masses greeted the war enthusiastically in 1914. He scrutinizes in depth the propaganda war, the often draconian suppression of dissent in the belligerent countries, the soldiers' diverse and often banal motives for fighting, and shifting combatant attitudes toward surrender, which, he asserts, was a risky act, since both sides routinely killed surrendering men. Changing attitudes toward surrender may have contributed to the final collapse of German form. In the end, Ferguson concludes, WWI was not unavoidable, but "the greatest error of modern history." Moving, penetrating, eye-opening, and lucidly reasoned. An important work of historical analysis. (Kirkus Reviews)