• Frigler. Midas'in Ulkesinde, Anitlarin Golgesinde / Phrygians. in the Land of Midas, in the Shadow of Monuments

    Frigler. Midas'in Ulkesinde, Anitlarin Golgesinde / Phrygians. in the Land of Midas, in the Shadow of Monuments (Paperback) By (author) Hakan Sivas, By (author) Taciser Tufekci Sivas

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    Short Description for Frigler. Midas'in Ulkesinde, Anitlarin Golgesinde / Phrygians. in the Land of Midas, in the Shadow of Monuments A large majority of the present population of the Central Anatolian Region lives in rural areas. They live on agriculture and animal husbandry. The destiny of the large part of the population of the region has remained unchanged. Central Anatolia with its wide agricultural fields is still the grain silo of the country. The geometric motifs particular to Phrygians on the Phrygian kilims called "tapetes," among the popular goods of the ancient world, still live on Sivrihisar kilims. Today, as in the past, the angora wool of Central Anatolia is still very valuable. Bronze bowls, used by the Phrygian elite as drinking vessels, have taken their place in our tradi...
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Full description for Frigler. Midas'in Ulkesinde, Anitlarin Golgesinde / Phrygians. in the Land of Midas, in the Shadow of Monuments

  • A large majority of the present population of the Central Anatolian Region lives in rural areas. They live on agriculture and animal husbandry. The destiny of the large part of the population of the region has remained unchanged. Central Anatolia with its wide agricultural fields is still the grain silo of the country. The geometric motifs particular to Phrygians on the Phrygian kilims called "tapetes," among the popular goods of the ancient world, still live on Sivrihisar kilims. Today, as in the past, the angora wool of Central Anatolia is still very valuable. Bronze bowls, used by the Phrygian elite as drinking vessels, have taken their place in our traditional baths as "naveled bath bowls." The music in the Phrygian mode that invoked ecstasy in religious rituals of the Mother Goddess Matar still lives in the Phrygian maqam, strained through the depths of ages. This shared destiny must be based on on a unison of ideas, beliefs and life, the roots of which go back to the Neolithic Age, mixed together through the ages in a melting pot. This bilingual book (Turkish - English) is richly illustrated with color images.