Persepolis 2: The Story of a Return

Persepolis 2: The Story of a Return

Hardback

By (author) Marjane Satrapi

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  • Publisher: Jonathan Cape Ltd
  • Format: Hardback | 192 pages
  • Dimensions: 161mm x 240mm x 18mm | 389g
  • Publication date: 1 March 2005
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 0224074407
  • ISBN 13: 9780224074407
  • Illustrations note: b&w drawings throught
  • Sales rank: 101,995

Product description

Here is the fascinating and equally unforgettable sequel to Persepolis, Marjane Satrapi's memoir-in-comic strips of growing up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution. Persepolis ended on a cliffhanger in 1984, just as fourteen-year-old Marjane was leaving behind her home in Tehran, escaping fundamentalism and the war with Iraq to begin a new life in the West. Here we follow our young, intrepid heroine through the next eight years of her life: an eye-opening and sometimes lonely four years of high school in Vienna, followed by a supremely educational and heartwrenching four years back home in Iran. Just as funny and heartbreaking as its predecessor - with perhaps an even greater sense of the ridiculous inspired by life in a fundamentalist state - Persepolis 2 is also as clear-eyed and searing in its condemnation of fundamentalism and its cost to the human spirit. In its depiction of the universal trials of adolescent life and growing into adulthood - here compounded by being an outsider both abroad and at home, and by living in a state where you have no right to show your hair, wear make-up, run in public, date, or question authority - it's raw, honest, and incredibly illuminating.

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Author information

Marjane Satrapi was born in 1969 in Rasht, Iran. She grew up in Tehran, where she studied at the French school, before leaving for Vienna and Strasbourg to study illustration. She currently lives in Paris and regularly contributes illustrations to newspapers and magazines internationally, including The New Yorker. She is the author of several children's books, as well as the critically acclaimed memoir Persepolis.

Review quote

"In an industry in which female artists can still be counted on the fingers of a yakuza's hand, her deceptively simple and acutely observed black and white memoirs deserve a wide audience" -- Dominic Wells The Times "Like Maus, Persepolis is one of those comic books capable of seducing even those most allergic to the genre... The author's masterstroke is to allow us to experience history from within her family, with irony and tenderness." Liberation "I cannot praise enough Marjane Satrapi's moving account of growing up as a spirited young girl in revolutionary and war-time Iran. Persepolis is disarming and often humorous but ultimately it is shattering." -- Joe Sacco

Flap copy

In Persepolis, heralded by the Los Angeles Times as "one of the freshest and most original memoirs of our day," Marjane Satrapi dazzled us with her heartrending memoir-in-comic-strips about growing up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution. Here is the continuation of her fascinating story. In 1984, Marjane flees fundamentalism and the war with Iraq to begin a new life in Vienna. Once there, she faces the trials of adolescence far from her friends and family, and while she soon carves out a place for herself among a group of fellow outsiders, she continues to struggle for a sense of belonging. Finding that she misses her home more than she can stand, Marjane returns to Iran after graduation. Her difficult homecoming forces her to confront the changes both she and her country have undergone in her absence and her shame at what she perceives as her failure in Austria. Marjane allows her past to weigh heavily on her until she finds some like-minded friends, falls in love, and begins studying art at a university. However, the repression and state-sanctioned chauvinism eventually lead her to question whether she can have a future in Iran. As funny and poignant as its predecessor, Persepolis 2 is another clear-eyed and searing condemnation of the human cost of fundamentalism. In its depiction of the struggles of growing up--here compounded by Marjane's status as an outsider both abroad and at home--it is raw, honest, and incredibly illuminating.