The Perks of Being a Wallflower

The Perks of Being a Wallflower

Book rating: 05 Paperback

By (author) Stephen Chbosky

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  • Publisher: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: Paperback | 256 pages
  • Dimensions: 127mm x 177mm x 7mm | 159g
  • Publication date: 3 August 1999
  • Publication City/Country: New York
  • ISBN 10: 0671027344
  • ISBN 13: 9780671027346
  • Sales rank: 1,795

Product description

Since its publication, Stephen Chbosky's haunting debut novel has received critical acclaim, provoked discussion and debate, grown into a cult phenomenon with over three million copies in print, spent over one year at #1 on the "New York Times "bestseller list, and inspired a major motion picture starring Logan Lerman and Emma Watson. "The Perks of Being a Wallflower" is a story about what it's like to travel that strange course through the uncharted territory of high school. The world of first dates, family dramas, and new friends. Of sex, drugs, and "The Rocky Horror Picture Show." Of those wild and poignant roller-coaster days known as growing up.

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Customer reviews

By Jordan 19 Aug 2012 5

This book is for anyone. Read this when you are a teenager, like me and you will see how this book shows in painful clarity how it is to grow up and not understand.

By Lauren Hoeve 12 Feb 2012 5

The Perks of Being a Wallflower is about a boy named Charlie who is in his first year of high school. He experiences a lot of new things, he learns to cope with his feelings and problems, the loss of his favourite aunt and his friend, and meanwhile, still tries to have a social life. He is a very emotional, socially awkward character and I think a lot of people will be able to relate to him. The writing style is very simple, it's almost like he's just talking to you instead of writing.

It's just an amazing book, A+, 5/5 stars, all that stuff. It's inspiring, thought-provoking, interesting, all of the positive adjectives you can think of. You will definitely like this book if you like John Green's books and It's Kind of a Funny Story by Ned Vizzini.

By TeensReadToo 02 Oct 2010 5

Charlie. Where to start with the character that every teen can relate to? He's not a character teens should look up to, respect, or idolize, because he makes the mistakes that every teen does. He is just proof that someone else really is going through the same thing. He really becomes more of a friend then anything.

This book is written as a journal, but Charlie writes like he's talking to a real person. It's definitely a different way of writing, and it really works for this book.

Charlie really is a wallflower. He looks at his life like he's watching through a window that he can't get on the other side of.

Charlie experiences all of the things that normal teens are exposed to, and he handles each in a different way.

Read THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER, because Charlie makes you realize that everyone is going though the same types of ordeals. Love him, hate him, root for him, and cherish him. I know I always will.

*Gold Star Award Winner!

Editorial reviews

Aspiring filmmaker/first-novelist Chbosky adds an upbeat ending to a tale of teenaged angst - the right combination of realism and uplift to allow it on high school reading lists, though some might object to the sexuality, drinking, and dope-smoking. More sophisticated readers might object to the rip-off of Salinger, though Chbosky pays homage by having his protagonist read Catcher in the Rye. Like Holden, Charlie oozes sincerity, rails against celebrity phoniness, and feels an extraliterary bond with his favorite writers (Harper Lee, Fitzgerald, Kerouac, Ayn Rand, etc.). But Charlie's no rich kid: the third child in a middle-class family, he attends public school in western Pennsylvania, has an older brother who plays football at Penn State, and an older sister who worries about boys a lot. An epistolary novel addressed to an anonymous "friend," Charlie's letters cover his first year in high school, a time haunted by the recent suicide of his best friend. Always quick to shed tears, Charlie also feels guilty about the death of his Aunt Helen, a troubled woman who lived with Charlie's family at the time of her fatal car wreck. Though he begins as a friendless observer, Charlie is soon pals with seniors Patrick and Sam (for Samantha), stepsiblings who include Charlie in their circle, where he smokes pot for the first time, drops acid, and falls madly in love with the inaccessible Sam. His first relationship ends miserably because Charlie remains compulsively honest, though he proves a loyal friend (to Patrick when he's gay-bashed) and brother (when his sister needs an abortion). Depressed when all his friends prepare for college, Charlie has a catatonic breakdown, which resolves itself neatly and reveals a long-repressed truth about Aunt Helen. A plain-written narrative suggesting that passivity, and thinking too much, lead to confusion and anxiety. Perhaps the folks at (co-publisher) MTV see the synergy here with Daria or any number of videos by the sensitive singer-songwriters they feature. (Kirkus Reviews)