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    Parachute Infantry: An American Paratrooper's Memoir of D-Day and the Fall of the Third Reich (Paperback) By (author) David Kenyon Webster, Introduction by Stephen A. Ambrose

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  • Full bibliographic data for Parachute Infantry

    Title
    Parachute Infantry
    Subtitle
    An American Paratrooper's Memoir of D-Day and the Fall of the Third Reich
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) David Kenyon Webster, Introduction by Stephen A. Ambrose
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 288
    Width: 152 mm
    Height: 229 mm
    Thickness: 15 mm
    Weight: 249 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780807122228
    ISBN 10: 080712222X
    Classifications

    BIC geographical qualifier V2: 1KBB
    BIC subject category V2: HBWQ, JW
    BIC E4L: WAR
    BIC geographical qualifier V2: 1DFG
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T4.2A
    BIC subject category V2: BGHA, HBJD, HBJK
    BISAC V2.8: HIS027100
    DC21: 940.548173
    BISAC V2.8: BIO008000
    Edition
    New edition
    Edition statement
    New edition
    Publisher
    Louisiana State University Press
    Imprint name
    Louisiana State University Press
    Publication date
    01 November 1997
    Publication City/Country
    Baton Rouge
    Review text
    It's a mystery why these splendid reminiscences of a gentleman ranker who served with the US Army's 101st Airborne Division in Europe during the climactic months of WW II were rejected by book publishers following their completion in the late 1940s. However, the frequently sardonic, dead-honest text proves well worth waiting for. A Harvard student before his induction, Webster signed on with the parachute infantry, a posting that earned him the privilege of dropping behind German lines early on D-day, long hours before Allied forces launched their coastal assault on France's Normandy Peninsula. Having survived the invasion and its aftermath, the author made his second and last combat jump into Holland for the Arnem campaign, during which he sustained a leg wound that took him out of action for nearly five months. Rejoining his unit at the start of 1945, Webster helped chase the battered but still deadly Wehrmacht through the Rhineland and into Bavaria. At war's end he and his comrades-in-arms were drinking Hitler's champagne in Bertchtesgaden, the Fuhrer's fabled Alpine redoubt. Occupation duty soon palled, however, and the author pulled all available strings to get himself stateside for demobilization. Webster, who went on to become a reporter with the Wall Street Journal, penned his memoir shortly after discharge, drawing mainly on letters he had written from Europe. A permanent private with the soul of a short-timer, he had many complaints about the chain of command, in particular its propensity for thoroughly briefing the troops before any action and leaving them in the dark once the shooting started. He also understood that the ties that bind men in battle have more to do with brotherhood and its obligations than either God or country. Webster's words will ring a resonant bell with the legions of GIs who rather enjoyed soldiering under fire but despised the military for its chickenshit rigidity. (Kirkus Reviews)