The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Anatolia

The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Anatolia : (10,000-323 BCE)

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The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Anatolia is a unique blend of comprehensive overviews on archaeological, philological, linguistic, and historical issues at the forefront of Anatolian scholarship in the 21st century. Anatolia is home to early complex societies and great empires, and was the destination of many migrants, visitors, and invaders. The offerings in this volume bring this reality to life as the chapters unfold nearly ten thousand years (ca. 10,000-323 B.C.E.) of peoples, languages, and diverse cultures who lived in or traversed Anatolia over these millennia. The contributors combine descriptions of current scholarship on important discussion and debates in Anatolian studies with new and cutting edge research for future directions of study. The fifty-four chapters are presented in five separate sections that range in topic from chronological and geographical overviews to anthropologically based issues of culture contact and imperial structures, and from historical settings of entire millennia to crucial data from key sites across the region. The contributors to the volume represent the best scholars in the field from North America, Europe, Turkey, and Asia. The appearance of this volume offers the very latest collection of studies on the fascinating peninsula known as Anatolia.

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  • Hardback | 1200 pages
  • 193.04 x 259.08 x 88.9mm | 2,245.27g
  • 23 Dec 2011
  • Oxford University Press Inc
  • New York
  • English
  • 0195376145
  • 9780195376142
  • 749,281

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Author Information

Sharon R. Steadman is Associate Professor of Anthropology, SUNY Cortland; Director of the Brooks Museum at SUNY Cortland. Gregory McMahon is Associate Professor of History and Humanities, University of New Hampshire.

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Review quote

The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Anatolia has much to recommend it. Most of its chapters are well written, researched, and presented, and will serve their purpose of introducing readers to ancient Anatolia admirably. The project was an ambitious one, involving the co-ordination of fifty-six scholars based in more than ten different countries, and the finished volume represents a rich resource for students and established scholars alike. Bryn Mawr Classical Review

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