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    Oxford Guide to Low Intensity CBT Interventions (Oxford Guides in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy) (Paperback) Edited by James Bennett-Levy, Edited by Dr. Helen Christensen, Edited by Paul Farrand, Edited by Dr. Kathleen Griffiths, Edited by Britt Klein, Edited by Mark A. Lau, Edited by Judy Proudfoot, Edited by David Kavanagh, Edited by Lee Ritterband

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    DescriptionMental disorders such as depression and anxiety are increasingly common. Yet there are too few specialists to offer help to everyone, and negative attitudes to psychological problems and their treatment discourage people from seeking it. As a result, many people never receive help for these problems. The Oxford Guide to Low Intensity CBT Interventions marks a turning point in the delivery of psychological treatments for people with depression and anxiety. Until recently, the only form of psychological intervention available for patients with depression and anxiety was traditional one-to-one 60 minute session therapy - usually with private practitioners for those patients who could afford it. Now Low Intensity CBT Interventions are starting to revolutionize mental health care by providing cost effective psychological therapies which can reach the vast numbers of people with depression and anxiety who did not previously have access to effective psychological treatment. The Oxford Guide to Low Intensity CBT Interventions is the first book to provide a comprehensive guide to Low Intensity CBT interventions. It brings together researchers and clinicians from around the world who have led the way in developing evidence-based low intensity CBT treatments. It charts the plethora of new ways that evidence-based low intensity CBT can be delivered: for instance, guided self-help, groups, advice clinics, brief GP interventions, internet-based or book-based treatment and prevention programs, with supported provided by phone, email, internet, sms or face-to-face. These new treatments require new forms of service delivery, new ways of communicating, new forms of training and supervision, and the development of new workforces. They involve changing systems and routine practice, and adapting interventions to particular community contexts. The Oxford Guide to Low Intensity CBT Interventions is a state-of-the-art handbook, providing low intensity practitioners, supervisors, managers commissioners of services and politicians with a practical, easy-to-read guide - indispensible reading for those who wish to understand and anticipate future directions in health service provision and to broaden access to cost-effective evidence-based psychological therapies.


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    Title
    Oxford Guide to Low Intensity CBT Interventions
    Authors and contributors
    Edited by James Bennett-Levy, Edited by Dr. Helen Christensen, Edited by Paul Farrand, Edited by Dr. Kathleen Griffiths, Edited by Britt Klein, Edited by Mark A. Lau, Edited by Judy Proudfoot, Edited by David Kavanagh, Edited by Lee Ritterband
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 632
    Width: 168 mm
    Height: 246 mm
    Thickness: 36 mm
    Weight: 1,021 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780199590117
    ISBN 10: 0199590117
    Classifications

    BIC E4L: HEA
    B&T Book Type: NF
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: S6.4
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 26960
    B&T Modifier: Subject Development: 20
    B&T Modifier: Region of Publication: 03
    BIC subject category V2: MMH
    Ingram Subject Code: PS
    Libri: I-PS
    BISAC V2.8: LAN009000
    B&T General Subject: 670
    B&T Modifier: Text Format: 02
    DC22: 616.8914
    B&T Merchandise Category: MAJ
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 03
    DC22: 616.89/14
    BIC subject category V2: JMP
    BISAC V2.8: PSY028000, PSY007000
    LC subject heading:
    BISAC V2.8: MED105000, PSY008000
    LC subject heading: , ,
    LC classification: RC489.C63 O93 2010
    BIC subject category V2: MMJT1
    Thema V1.0: CF, JMP, MKL, MKMT6
    Illustrations note
    Illustrations, map
    Publisher
    Oxford University Press
    Imprint name
    Oxford University Press
    Publication date
    01 July 2010
    Publication City/Country
    Oxford
    Author Information
    Britt Klein is the Co-Director of the National eTherapy Centre; the Co-Director of the Swin-PsyCHE e-Therapy Unit; and an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Life and Social Sciences at Swinburne University, Melbourne, Australia. Since 1998 she has been developing and evaluating internet-based mental and physical health interventions as a means to increase access to health services by utilising low intensity CBT intervention modalities. Her biggest achievement to date is the co-creation of Anxiety Online (www.anxietyonline.org.au): a full service education and training, online psychological assessment and treatment clinic for the anxiety disorders open to the general public. She has been awarded numerous grants to develop and evaluate internet-based wellbeing, prevention and treatment programs, has published widely, teaches and supervises students in the field of internet interventions and she is the Co-Editor of the e-Journal of Applied Psychology.
    Review quote
    This excellent book addresses an important new topic in a comprehensive manner...This is must reading for CBT practitioners. Doody's Notes
    Table of contents
    Foreword ; SECTION 1 LOW INTENSITY CBT MODELS AND CONCEPTUAL UNDERPINNINGS ; Overview ; 1. Low Intensity CBT Interventions: A Revolution in Mental Health Services ; 2. Access and Organisation: Putting Low Intensity Interventions to Work in Clinical Services ; 3. The STEPS Model: a High Volume, Multi-level, Multi-purpose approach to address Common Mental Health Problems ; 4. Increasing Access and Effectiveness: Using the Internet to deliver Low Intensity Cognitive Behaviour Therapy ; 5. A New Language for CBT: New ways of Working Require New Thinking as well as New Words ; SECTION 2A: INTRODUCING AND SUPPORTING GUIDED CBT ; Overview ; 6. Low Intensity CBT Assessment: In Person or by Phone ; 7. Monitoring & Evaluation in Low Intensity CBT Interventions ; 8. Introducing and Supporting Written and Internet-Based Guided CBT ; 9. Matching clients to CBT self-help resources ; 10. Collaborative Care: The Effective Organization of Treatment for Depression ; 11. Supervising low intensity workers ; SECTION 2B KEY LOW INTENSITY CBT INTERVENTIONS IN DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY ; Overview ; 12. Behavioural Activation for Depression ; 13. Problem Solving Therapy for Depression ; 14. Increasing Physical activity as a Low Intensity Treatment for Depression ; 15. Key Components of Low Intensity Interventions for Anxiety ; 16. Brief Motivational Interviewing for Depression and Anxiety ; 17. Low Intensity Interventions for Chronic Insomnia ; SECTION 2C: GUIDED CBT INTERVENTIONS USING WRITTEN MATERIALS ; Overview ; 18. Choosing self-help books wisely: Sorting the wheat from the chaff ; 19. Using Guided Self-Help Book Prescription Schemes ; 20. Delivering book based CBT Self-Help Classes in health service, further education and voluntary sector services ; SECTION 2D: GUIDED CBT INTERVENTIONS USING THE INTERNET ; Overview ; 21. Turn On, Tune In and (Don't) Drop Out: Engagement, Adherence, Attrition and Alliance with Internet-based CBT Interventions ; 22. Treatment Credibility and Satisfaction with Internet Interventions ; 23. Internet-based Mental Health Screening ; 24. Standards and Operating Guidelines for Internet Interventions ; 25. Guided CBT Internet Interventions: Specific Issues in Supporting Clients with Depression, Anxiety and Co-Morbid Conditions ; SECTION 2E NOVEL USES OF COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES: SUPPORTING LOW INTENSITY CBT IN NEW ENVIRONMENTS ; Overview ; 26. Using different communication channels to support internet interventions ; 27. Supporting Low Intensity Interventions using the Telephone ; 28. Use of Short-Messaging Service (SMS) To Enhance Low Intensity CBT ; 29. Email in Low Intensity CBT Interventions ; 30. Online Mutual Support Bulletin Boards ; 31. Low Intensity Cognitive Behavioural Therapies by Mail (M-CBT) ; SECTION 2F STEPPING FURTHER OUTSIDE THE BOX: EXTENDING THE ENVIRONMENTS FOR LOW INTENSITY CBT ; Overview ; 32. Large group didactic CBT classes for common mental health problems ; 33. Cognitive Behaviour Group Therapy (CBGT): Capitalizing on efficiency and humanity ; 34. Will you follow while they lead? Introducing a patient-led approach to low intensity CBT interventions ; 35. The Advice Clinic or What I did in my thirty minutes ; 36. Low intensity CBT Interventions by General Practitioners ; 37. Adapting low intensity CBT for clients with severe mental disorder ; SECTION 2G: GOING UPSTREAM: USING LOW INTENSITY CBT INTERVENTIONS TO PREVENT MENTAL HEALTH PROBLEMS ; Overview ; 38. Group CBT for prevention of depression in adults ; 39. Internet-delivered prevention for anxiety and depression disorders in adults ; 40. Low intensity targeted group prevention of depression in adolescents and children ; 41. Internet-based anxiety and depression prevention programs for children and adolescents ; 42. Parental programs for preventing behavioural and emotional problems in children ; 43. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy: a low intensity group program to prevent depressive relapse ; SECTION 3 TRAINING LOW INTENSITY CBT PRACTITIONERS ; Overview ; 44. Training low intensity workers ; 45. Training Depression Care Managers ; 46. Training Peers to Provide Low Intensity CBT Support: The Value of Personal Experience ; 47. Training the Wider Workforce in the Use of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Written Self-help Resources ; 48. Training GPs to prescribe depression self-management ; 49. Training Clinicians Online to be Etherapists: The 'Anxiety Online' model ; 50. From Classroom to 'Shop Floor': Challenges Faced As A Low Intensity Practitioner ; SECTION 4A: FACILITATING THE UPTAKE OF LOW INTENSITY CBT INTERVENTIONS: CHANGING SYSTEMS AND ROUTINE PRACTICE ; Overview ; 51. Establishing the Improved Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) Program: Lessons from large-scale change in England ; 52. Implementing Low Intensity Interventions: What Governments want and why ; 53. Challenges and Potential Solutions in Integrating Internet-based CBT Interventions into Specialist Services ; 54. Achieving widespread dissemination of low intensity evidence-based practices: The experience of the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program ; 55. Practical Service Redesign: Helping GPs to Enhance Depression Care ; 56. Implementing low-intensity CBT (LI CBT) in case management of clients with severe mental illness ; 57. Effective Partnerships with Community Groups ; SECTION 4B: FACILITATING THE UPTAKE OF LOW INTENSITY CBT INTERVENTIONS: ADAPTING INTERVENTIONS TO DIFFERENT COMMUNITY CONTEXTS ; Overview ; 58. Bringing the public on board: Health promotion and social marketing in deprived communities ; 59. Enhancing Community Awareness of Depression and Access to Treatment: Experiences with beyondblue ; 60. Problems and Potentials in Rolling out Low Intensity CBT in Rural Communities ; 61. Improving Access to Low intensity Interventions for Ethnic Minority Communities ; 62. Low intensity CBT with Indigenous consumers: Creative solutions for culturally appropriate mental health care