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    The Oxford Companion to Archaeology (Oxford Companions) (Hardback) Edited by Brian M. Fagan

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    DescriptionWhen we think of archaeology, most of us think first of its many spectacular finds: the legendary city of Troy, Tutankhamun's golden tomb, the three-million-year-old footprints at Laetoli, the mile-high city at Machu Picchu, the cave paintings at Lascaux. But as marvelous as these discoveries are, the ultimate goal of archaeology, and of archaeologists, is something far more ambitious. Indeed, it is one of humanity's great quests: to recapture and understand our human past, across vast stretches of time, as it was lived in every corner of the globe. Now, in The Oxford Companion to Archaeology, readers have a comprehensive and authoritative overview of this fascinating discipline, in a book that is itself a rare find, a treasure of up-to-date information on virtually every aspect of the field. The range of subjects covered here is breathtaking - everything from the domestication of the camel, to Egyptian hieroglyphics, to luminescence dating, to the Mayan calendar, to Koobi Fora and Olduvai Gorge. Readers will find extensive essays that illuminate the full history of archaeology - from the discovery of Herculaneum in 1783, to the recent finding of the 'Ice Man' and the ancient city of Uruk - and engaging biographies of the great figures in the field, from Gertrude Bell, Paul Emile Botta, and Louis and Mary Leakey, to V. Gordon Childe, Li Chi, Heinrich Schliemann, and Max Uhle. The Companion offers extensive coverage of the methods used in archaeological research, revealing how archaeologists find sites (remote sensing, aerial photography, ground survey), how they map excavations and report findings, and how they analyse artifacts (radiocarbon dating, dendrochronology, stratigraphy, mortuary analysis). Of course, archaeology's great subject is humanity and human culture, and there are broad essays that examine human evolution - ranging from our early primate ancestors, to Australopithecus and Cro-Magnon, to Homo Erectus and Neanderthals - and explore the many general facets of culture, from art and architecture, to arms and armour, to beer and brewing, to astronomy and religion. And perhaps most important, the contributors provide insightful coverage of human culture as it has been expressed in every region of the world. Here entries range from broad overviews, to treatments of particular themes, to discussions of peoples, societies, and particular sites. Thus, anyone interested in North America would find articles that cover the continent from the Arctic to the Eastern woodlands to the Northwest Coast, that discuss the Iroquois and Algonquian cultures, the hunters of the North American plains, and the Norse in North America, and that describe sites such as Mesa Verde, Meadowcraft Rockshelter, Serpent Mound, and Poverty Point. Likewise, the coverage of Europe runs from the Paleolithic period, to the Bronze and Iron Age, to the Post-Roman era, looks at peoples such as the Celts, the Germans, the Vikings, and the Slavs, and describes sites at Altamira, Pompeii, Stonehenge, Terra Amata, and dozens of other locales. The Companion offers equally thorough coverage of Africa, Europe, North America, Mesoamerica, South America, Asia, the Mediterranean, the Near East, Australia and the Pacific. And finally, the editors have included extensive cross-referencing and thorough indexing, enabling the reader to pursue topics of interest with ease; charts and maps providing additional information; and bibliographies after most entries directing readers to the best sources for further study. Every Oxford Companion aspires to be the definitive overview of a field of study at a particular moment of time. This superb volume is no exception.


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  • Full bibliographic data for The Oxford Companion to Archaeology

    Title
    The Oxford Companion to Archaeology
    Authors and contributors
    Edited by Brian M. Fagan
    Physical properties
    Format: Hardback
    Number of pages: 864
    Width: 202 mm
    Height: 257 mm
    Thickness: 49 mm
    Weight: 1,747 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780195076189
    ISBN 10: 0195076184
    Classifications

    BIC subject category V2: GBC
    B&T Book Type: NF
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T5.5
    BIC E4L: HIS
    LC subject heading:
    B&T Modifier: Region of Publication: 01
    LC subject heading: ,
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 01
    B&T General Subject: 750
    Ingram Subject Code: AH
    Libri: I-AH
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 14100
    BISAC V2.8: SOC003000
    BIC subject category V2: HD
    B&T Modifier: Text Format: 51
    BISAC V2.8: REL072000
    B&T Merchandise Category: POD
    BISAC V2.8: SOC023000
    B&T Approval Code: A17010000
    DC22: 930.103
    LC subject heading:
    DC21: 930.103
    LC classification: CC70.O96 1
    LC subject heading:
    DC22: 930.1/03
    LC subject heading:
    LC classification: CC70 .O96 1996
    Thema V1.0: GBC, NK
    Edition statement
    New ed.
    Illustrations note
    maps and charts
    Publisher
    Oxford University Press Inc
    Imprint name
    Oxford University Press Inc
    Publication date
    13 March 1997
    Publication City/Country
    New York
    Author Information
    Brian M. Fagan is Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is internationally known for his books and articles on archaeology for general readers, among them The Rape of the Nile, The Adventure of Archaeology, and Time Detectives. Charlotte Beck is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Hamilton College. George Michaels is a Mayan archaeologist and an Instructional Consultant at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Chris Scarre is Assistant Director of the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research at the University of Cambridge. Neil Asher Silberman is an independent scholar.
    Review quote
    The match between authors and topics is impressive. Fagan has somehow persuaded top archaeologists to write about what they know best. The Oxford Companion is aimed at students and serious professionals as well as the general public, and has strong entries dealing with ideas, political issues and intellectual principles. Warwick Bray, Nature The 700 articles in its 840 pages are arranged alpgabetically, cross-referenced, and supplemented with maps and chronological tables. Church Times A first place to start for all your future enquiries. Anthony Sinclair, Antiquity, Volume 71, Number 272, June 1997 What is the difference between a companion, a dictionary, an encyclopedia ... In the case of The Oxford Companion to Archaeology, the answer is its sheer readability ... this volume may be pleasurably read from cover to cover ... It maintains a quality of writing and depth of analysis across a huge variety of topics ... this book is an authoritative and clearly written global assessment of archaeology that judiciously balances the well publicised with the less well known. Times Higher Education Supplement Like all Oxford Companions, it aspires to be the definitive overview of the subject. Church Times An excellent overview of what it is that archaeologists do and have done ... It ranges widely from the expected (Giza, Easter Island and so forth) to the unexpected (archaeology in science fiction), via some helpful, intelligent entries. New Scientist
    Review text
    The purpose of archaeology is to understand our human past across great stretches of time. The high points are the famous sites such as Stonehenge or the cave paintings at Lascaux, but the smaller, less glamorous, sites sometimes offer us more of an insight into the past, such as the domestication of the camel. Here are short essays that cover everything from the discovery of Herculaneum to the uncovering of Ice Man, from archaeology in fiction to the Nasca civilization, from Olduvai Gorge to Mediterranean trade through the ages; through Islamic, Indo, Iroquois, Inca and Iron ages and civilizations. It is an alphabetically arranged volume with clear cross-referencing, contributed to by hundreds of academic authorities. The entries are clearly written but a major gripe is the lack of illustration - nevertheless, a fabulous book. (Kirkus UK)
    Back cover copy
    The range of subjects covered here is breath-taking - everything from the domestication of the camel, to Egyptian hieroglyphics, to luminescence dating, to the Mayan calendar, to Koobi Fora and Olduvai Gorge. Readers will find extensive essays that illuminate the full history of archaeology - from the discovery of Herculaneum in 1783, to the recent finding of the "Ice Man", and the ancient city of Uruk - and engaging biographies of the great figures in the field, from Gertrude Bell, Paul Emile Botta, and Louis and Mary Leakey, to V. Gordon Childe, Li Chi, Heinrich Schliemann, and Max Uhle. The Companion offers extensive coverage of the methods used in archaeological research, revealing how archaeologists find sites (remote sensing, aerial photography, ground survey), how they map excavations and report findings, and how they analyze artifacts (radiocarbon dating, dendrochronology, stratigraphy, mortuary analysis). Of course, archaeology's great subject is humanity and human culture, and there are broad essays that examine human evolution - ranging from our early primate ancestors, to Australopithecus and the Cro-Magnons, to Homo erectus and the Neanderthals - and explore the many general facets of culture, from art and architecture, to arms and armor, to beer and brewing, to astronomy and religion. And perhaps most important, the contributors provide insightful coverage of human culture as it has been expressed in every region of the world. Here entries range from broad overviews, to treatments of particular themes, to discussions of peoples, societies, and particular sites. Thus, anyone interested in North America would find articles that cover the continent from the Arctic to theEastern Woodlands to the Northwest Coast; that discuss the Iroquois and Algonquian cultures, the hunters of the North American Plains, and the Norse in North America; and that describe sites such as Mesa Verde, Meadowcroft Rockshelter, Serpent Mound, and Poverty Point. Likewise, the coverage of Europe runs from the Paleolithic period, to the Bronze and Iron Ages, to the Post-Roman era; looks at peoples such as the Celts, the Germans, the Vikings, and the Slavs; and describes sites at Altamira, Pompeii, Stonehenge, Terra Amata, and dozens of other locales. The Companion offers equally thorough coverage of Africa, Europe, North America, Mesoamerica, South America, Asia, the Mediterranean, the Near East, Australia, and the Pacific. And finally, the editors have included extensive cross-referencing and thorough indexing, enabling the reader to pursue topics of interest with ease; charts and maps providing additional information; and bibliographies after most entries directing readers to the best sources for further study.