In Our Mothers' House

In Our Mothers' House

Hardback

By (author) Patricia Polacco

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  • Publisher: Philomel Books,U.S.
  • Format: Hardback | 48 pages
  • Dimensions: 221mm x 284mm x 13mm | 522g
  • Publication date: 18 June 2009
  • Publication City/Country: New York
  • ISBN 10: 039925076X
  • ISBN 13: 9780399250767
  • Illustrations note: colour illustrations
  • Sales rank: 200,677

Product description

Marmee, Meema, and the kids are just like any other family on the block. In their beautiful house, they cook dinner together, they laugh together, and they dance together." But some of the other families don't accept them. They say they are different. How can a family have two moms and no dad? But Marmee and Meema's house is full of love. And they teach their children that different doesn't mean wrong. And no matter how many moms or dads they have, they are everything a family is meant to be. Here is a true Polacco story of a family, living by their own rules, and the strength they gain by the love they feel. "

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Editorial reviews

The placement of the title's possessive apostrophe here is no typo: Two mothers own this house, and they have filled it with lots of love. Unfortunately, while this ambitious picture book seeks to offer an inclusive vision of family, it ultimately comes up short. Meema and Marmee's eldest daughter offers a sweeping narrative about three children embraced by their loving, interracial, adoptive family and multicultural community, with their "mothers' house" at the center of it all. It is outside of this safe haven that the children face overt and neatly contained homophobia in the character of one bad apple, who declares, "I don't appreciate what you two are!" The distillation of hate into a single character undermines the reality of systematic oppression faced by same-sex couples; furthermore, the flash-forward narration depicting each child grown and married into heterosexual, monoracial unions ironically presents this family as an anomaly. There is a desperate need for books that present queer families as just another part of the American quilt, but this title, despite its obvious good intentions, doesn't do it. (Picture book. 6-8) (Kirkus Reviews)