Orientalism
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Orientalism

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Description

The noted critic and a Palestinian now teaching at Columbia University, examines the way in which the West observes the Arabsshow more

Product details

  • 12-17
  • Paperback | 379 pages
  • 132.08 x 198.12 x 25.4mm | 317.51g
  • Random House USA Inc
  • Vintage Books
  • New York, United States
  • English
  • 1st Vintage Books ed
  • bibliog , index
  • 039474067X
  • 9780394740676
  • 22,961

Flap copy

The noted critic and a Palestinian now teaching at Columbia University, examines the way in which the West observes the Arabs.show more

Review quote

"The theme is the way in which intellectual traditions are created and trans-mitted... Orientalism is the example Mr. Said uses, and by it he means something precise. The scholar who studies the Orient (and specifically the Muslim Orient), the imaginitive writer who takes it as his subject, and the institutions which have been concerned with teaching it, settling it, ruling it, all have a certain representation or idea of the Orient defined as being other than the Occident, mysterious, unchanging and ultimately inferior." --Albert Hourani, New York Review of Booksshow more

Review Text

"Intellectual history on a high order . . . and very exciting." -- The New York Times "Powerful and disturbing. . . . The theme is the way in which intellectual traditions are created and transmitted." -- The New York Review of Books "Stimulating, elegant yet pugnacious. . . . Said observes the West observing the Arabs, and he does not like what he finds." -- The Observer "An important book. . . . Never has there been as sustained and as persuasive a case against Orientalism as Said's." -- Jerusalem Postshow more

About Edward W. Said

Edward W. Said was born in 1935 in Jerusalem, raised in Jerusalem and Cairo, and educated in the United States, where he attended Princeton (B.A. 1957) and Harvard (M.A. 1960; Ph.D. 1964). In 1963, he began teaching at Columbia University, where he was University Professor of English and Comparative Literature. He died in 2003 in New York City. He is the author of twenty-two books which have been translated into 35 languages, including Orientalism (1978); The Question of Palestine (1979); Covering Islam (1980); The World, the Text, and the Critic (1983); Culture and Imperialism (1993); Peace and Its Discontents: Essays on Palestine and the Middle East Peace Process (1996); and Out of Place: A Memoir (1999). Besides his academic work, he wrote a twice-monthly column for Al-Hayat and Al-Ahram; was a regular contributor to newspapers in Europe, Asia, and the Middle East; and was the music critic for The Nation.show more