One Hundred Years of Solitude

One Hundred Years of Solitude

Hardback

By (author) Gabriel Garcia Marquez

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  • Publisher: EVERYMAN'S LIBRARY
  • Format: Hardback | 416 pages
  • Dimensions: 128mm x 210mm x 30mm | 540g
  • Publication date: 21 September 1995
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 1857152239
  • ISBN 13: 9781857152234
  • Illustrations note: geneal. table
  • Sales rank: 102,292

Product description

In the book which put South America on the literary map, Marquez tells the haunting story of a community lost in the depths of that almighty continent where time passes slowly. A poetic masterpiece whose rich and powerful language easily survives the translation from Spanish, this is the most celebrated text of magic realism, the literary movement which has dominated world fiction for the last thirty years.

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Review quote

"Each attractive volume presents recent essays by noted critics who examine in detail aspects of a single literary work...Highly recommended for academic collections."

Editorial reviews

As a Nobel Prize for Literature winner (1982), Gabriel Garcia Marquez has already been acknowledged as one of the greatest writers of this century. The hugely influential One Hundred Years of Solitude is a novel with magnificent scope and panoramic perspective, formed by his much lauded 'magic realism' style. The town of Macondo and its fatalistic inhabitants are weaved into a story which is simultaneously complex and simple. From the moment when the gypsy Melquiades arrives in the land-locked settlement of Macondo with his inventions from beyond the water, and the first of the Buendia family embarks on his craze for alchemy, readers around the world understood that a new kind of fiction had arrived. Though it was for Marquez's visions of levitating laundry and showers of butterflies that the coinage 'magic realism' came to be minted, the novel is loved no less for its understanding of the way the human psyche finds itself so frequently teetering on a terrifying pinnacle between longing and refusal than for its colossal inventions in the natural world. (Kirkus UK)