On Waterloo: Clausewitz, Wellington, and the Campaign of 1815

On Waterloo: Clausewitz, Wellington, and the Campaign of 1815

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By (author) And Wellington Clausewitz and Wellington, By (author) Carl von Clausewitz, By (author) 1st Duke of Wellington Arthu Wellesley, Edited by Christopher Bassford, Edited by Daniel Moran

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  • Publisher: Createspace
  • Format: Paperback | 318 pages
  • Dimensions: 150mm x 228mm x 20mm | 440g
  • Publication date: 20 April 2010
  • Publication City/Country: North Charleston SC
  • ISBN 10: 1453701508
  • ISBN 13: 9781453701508
  • Illustrations note: black & white illustrations
  • Sales rank: 499,648

Product description

This book at last makes available in English a penetrating exchange between two of history's most famous soldiers concerning the dramatic events of the Waterloo campaign of 1815. The Duke of Wellington is one of the greatest military commanders in British history; General Carl von Clausewitz is widely regarded as the greatest military thinker in the history of Western civilization. Both men had vast experience in the Napoleonic Wars, and both were prominent participants in the campaign. Wellington commanded the Anglo-Dutch-Belgian army; the much younger Clausewitz was chief-of-staff to Prussia's 3rd Corps. Wellington went on to become prime minister of Great Britain and commander-in-chief-for-life of the British Army. Clausewitz went on to author VOM KRIEGE (ON WAR), a seminal and still hotly debated treatise on the theory and philosophy of war. He also became the founder of modern, "scientific" military history, via the work of his disciple, military historian Hans Delbruck. Oddly, Clausewitz's study of the campaign of 1815 was never published in English, and Wellington's once-famous response to it has been strangely but studiously ignored by British military historians since 1914. Hence this book. It contains Wellington's initial battle report; Clausewitz's post-battle letters to his wife Marie; correspondence within Wellington's circle concerning Clausewitz's work; Clausewitz's strategic analysis of the entire campaign (not just the Battle of Waterloo); Wellington's memorandum in response; and enlightening essays by prominent experts on Clausewitz, Wellington, and the Battle of Waterloo. Major General [U.S. Army] David T. Zabecki, Ph.D., writes in the April 2011 edition of The Journal of Military History: "Long overdue, we now have two English translations of [Clausewitz's] The Campaign of 1815 [i.e., Peter Hofschroer's translation of Clausewitz's study and Bassford, Moran, and Pedlow's edition of the full Clausewitz-Wellington exchange]. Either of these volumes would be a welcome addition to the bookshelf of any serious student of military affairs, but On Waterloo: Clausewitz, Wellington, and the Campaign of 1815 is clearly the richer of the two." The Editors: Christopher Bassford is Professor of Strategy at the National War College, in Washington, DC. Daniel Moran is Professor of National Security Affairs at the Naval Postgraduate School, in Monterey, CA. Gregory W. Pedlow is Chief of the Historical Office at NATO's Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE), near Mons, Belgium."

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Author information

General Carl von Clausewitz (1780-1831) was a Prussian army officer during the wars of the French Revolution and Napoleon. He is most famous as the author of ON WAR, a philosophical treatise on the nature of war that remains the center of hot debate (at least 10 books on him have been published in English in the last four years alone). But he also wrote several histories, including one on the campaign of 1815. Arthur Wellesley, the first Duke of Wellington (1769-1851), is one of the most famous British commanders of all time, victor over Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo. Other than his official battle report, Wellington wrote only one serious essay concerning that battle, and that essay was in response to Clausewitz's study.