• The Oldest Cuisine in the World: Cooking in Mesopotamia See large image

    The Oldest Cuisine in the World: Cooking in Mesopotamia (Hardback) By (author) Jean Bottero, Translated by Teresa Lavender Fagan

    $43.50 - Save $7.36 14% off - RRP $50.86 Free delivery worldwide Available
    Dispatched in 2 business days
    When will my order arrive?
    Add to basket | Add to wishlist |

    Also available in...
    Paperback $17.99

    DescriptionIn this intriguing blend of the commonplace and the ancient, Jean Bottero presents the first extensive look at the delectable secrets of Mesopotamia. Bottero's broad perspective takes us inside the religious rites, everyday rituals, attitudes and taboos, and even the detailed preparation techniques involving food and drink in Mesopotamian high culture during the second and third millenniums BCE, as the Mesopotamians recorded them. Offering everything from translated recipes for pigeon and gazelle stews to the contents of medicinal teas and broths and the origins of ingredients native to the region, this book reveals the cuisine of one of history's most fascinating societies. Links to the modern world, along with incredible re-creations of a rich, ancient culture through its cuisine, make Bottero's guide an entertaining and mesmerizing read.


Other books

Other books in this category
Showing items 1 to 11 of 11

 

Reviews | Bibliographic data
  • Full bibliographic data for The Oldest Cuisine in the World

    Title
    The Oldest Cuisine in the World
    Subtitle
    Cooking in Mesopotamia
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Jean Bottero, Translated by Teresa Lavender Fagan
    Physical properties
    Format: Hardback
    Number of pages: 152
    Width: 60 mm
    Height: 90 mm
    Thickness: 19 mm
    Weight: 374 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780226067353
    ISBN 10: 0226067351
    Classifications

    B&T Book Type: NF
    BIC E4L: FOO
    BIC subject category V2: HBLA, JHBT
    B&T Modifier: Region of Publication: 01
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T16.1
    BIC subject category V2: HBJF1
    B&T General Subject: 240
    B&T Modifier: Subject Development: 43
    Ingram Subject Code: CW
    Libri: I-CW
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 01
    B&T Modifier: Subject Development: 01
    BIC subject category V2: WBN
    Ingram Theme: CHRN/ANCIEN
    BISAC Merchandising Theme: ET135
    Ingram Theme: CULT/MIDEST
    BISAC V2.8: CKB041000
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 14510
    BISAC V2.8: HIS026000
    B&T Modifier: Geographic Designator: 07
    B&T Merchandise Category: UP
    B&T Modifier: Geographic Designator: 52
    BISAC V2.8: HIS002000
    BIC geographical qualifier V2: 1QDAM
    DC22: 641.5935
    LC classification: TX725.I72 B68 2004
    LC subject heading: , , , , ,
    LC classification: TX725.I72
    LC subject heading: , ,
    BIC subject category V2: 1QDAM
    BISAC region code: 2.1.8.0.0.0.0
    Thema V1.0: JHMC, JHB, NHC, NHG, WBN
    Illustrations note
    2 line drawings
    Publisher
    The University of Chicago Press
    Imprint name
    University of Chicago Press
    Publication date
    04 May 2004
    Publication City/Country
    Chicago, IL
    Author Information
    Jean Bottero (1914-2007) was director emeritus of L'Ecole pratique des hautes etudes in Paris. He is the author of many books, several of which have been translated and published by the University of Chicago Press. Teresa Lavender Fagan has translated numerous books for the University of Chicago Press.
    Review quote
    "An enticing new book of Ancient Mesopotamian recipes." (The Times) "Truly a wonderful read." (History Today)"
    Flap copy
    In this intriguing blend of the commonplace and the ancient, Jean Bottero presents the first extensive look at the delectable secrets of Mesopotamia. Bottero's broad perspective takes us inside the religious rites, everyday rituals, attitudes and taboos, and even the detailed preparation techniques involving food and drink in Mesopotamian high culture during the second and third millenniums BCE, as the Mesopotamians recorded them. Offering everything from translated recipes for pigeon and gazelle stews, the contents of medicinal teas and broths, and the origins of ingredients native to the region, this book reveals the cuisine of one of history's most fascinating societies. As Bottero concludes, although the ingredients may have differed, food was prepared in a manner astoundingly similar to how we do it today. Such links to the modern world, along with incredible recreations of a rich, ancient culture through its cuisine, make Bottero's guide an entertaining and mesmerizing read.