Oklahoma Seminoles

Oklahoma Seminoles : Medicines, Magic and Religion

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Description

"Oklahoma Seminoles is a much-needed ethnography of a native American population that has been frequently overlooked or underplayed in the anthropological literature. The main focus of the volume is on medicine and magic. However, Seminole history, ceremonialism, sports and games, religion, mortuary practices, folklore, and culture change are also treated....At this point the book represents the best general source of ethnographic information about the Oklahoma Seminoles available in the literature. Both historians and anthropologists should find it useful." Journal of Southern History "James Howard has provided a valuable contribution in this description of 'traditional' religious, magical, and medical belief and practice among the contemporary Seminole Indians of Oklahoma....The book's major strength is that it is a comprehensive descriptive overview of its subject. An additional strength lies in the illustrations by Willie Lena, which reflect the view of a native traditionalist and are ethnographic documents in themselves." Ethnohistory "This is a valuable scholarly source for comparative studies with other tribes or for the impact of white culture upon on uprooted native people." Journal of the West Volume 166 in The Civilization of the American Indian Series James H. Howard was Professor of Anthropology at Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK. He was the author of several books and articles in the field of American Indian studies.

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Product details

  • Paperback | 304 pages
  • 134.62 x 208.28 x 25.4mm | 408.23g
  • University of Oklahoma Press
  • Oklahoma, United States
  • English
  • New edition
  • New edition
  • 81ill.27figs.
  • 0806122382
  • 9780806122380

Review quote

"This is a valuable scholarly source for comparative studies with other tribes or for the impact of white culture upon an uprooted native people."--"Journal of the West"

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