• Notebook of a Return to My Native Land: Cahier d'un Retour au Pays Natal See large image

    Notebook of a Return to My Native Land: Cahier d'un Retour au Pays Natal (Bloodaxe Contemporary French Poets) (Paperback)(English / French) By (author) Aime Cesaire, Edited by Mireille Rosello, Translated by Mireille Rosello, Translated by Annie Pritchard

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    DescriptionFrench-English bilingual edition. Andre Breton called Cesaire's Cahier 'nothing less than the greatest lyrical monument of this time'. It is a seminal text in Surrealist, French and Black literatures - published in full in English for the first time in Bloodaxe's bilingual Contemporary French Poets series. Aime Cesaire (1913-2008) was born in in Basse-Pointe, a village on the north coast of Martinique, a former French colony in the Caribbean (now an overseas departement of France). His book Discourse on Colonialism (1950) is a classic of French political literature. Notebook of a Return to My Native Land (1956) is the foundation stone of francophone Black literature: it is here that the word Negritude appeared for the first time. Negritude has come to mean the cultural, philosophical and political movement co-founded in Paris in the 1930s by three Black students from French colonies: the poets Leon-Gontran Damas from French Guiana; Leopold Senghor, later President of Senegal; and Aime Cesaire, who became a deputy in the French National Assembly for the Revolutionary Party of Martinique and was repeatedly elected Mayor of Fort-de-France. As a poet, Cesaire believed in the revolutionary power of language, and in the Notebook he combined high literary French with Martinican colloquialisms, and archaic turns of phrase with dazzling new coinages. The result is a challenging and deeply moving poem on the theme of the future of the negro race which presents and enacts the poignant search for a Martinican identity. The Notebook opposes the ideology of colonialism by inventing a language that refuses assimilation to a dominant cultural norm, a language that teaches resistance and liberation.


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  • Full bibliographic data for Notebook of a Return to My Native Land

    Title
    Notebook of a Return to My Native Land
    Subtitle
    Cahier d'un Retour au Pays Natal
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Aime Cesaire, Edited by Mireille Rosello, Translated by Mireille Rosello, Translated by Annie Pritchard
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 160
    Width: 136 mm
    Height: 212 mm
    Thickness: 14 mm
    Weight: 259 g
    Language
    English
    French
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9781852241841
    ISBN 10: 1852241845
    Classifications

    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 21500
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T3.1
    BIC E4L: LIT
    BIC subject category V2: DCF, DC
    LC subject heading:
    Ingram Subject Code: PO
    Libri: I-PO
    DC21: 841
    BISAC V2.8: POE005030
    DC22: 841
    LC subject heading:
    Thema V1.0: DCF
    Illustrations note
    maps
    Publisher
    BLOODAXE BOOKS LTD
    Imprint name
    BLOODAXE BOOKS LTD
    Publication date
    01 March 1995
    Publication City/Country
    Tyne and Wear
    Author Information
    Aime Cesaire (1913-2008) was born in Basse-Pointe, a village on the north coast of Martinique, a former French colony in the Caribbean (now an overseas departement of France). His book Discourse on Colonialism (1950) is a classic of French political literature. Notebook of a Return to My Native Land (1956) is the foundation stone of francophone Black literature: it is here that the word Negritude appeared for the first time. Negritude has come to mean the cultural, philosophical and political movement co-founded in Paris in the 1930s by three Black students from French colonies: the poets Leon-Gontran Damas from French Guiana; Leopold Senghor, later President of Senegal; and Aime Cesaire, who became a deputy in the French National Assembly for the Revolutionary Party of Martinique and was repeatedly elected Mayor of Fort-de-France. Cesaire attended high school and college in France, returning to Martinique during the Second World War. He was mayor of Fort-de-France from 1945 to 2001, except for a break from 1983 to 1984. He helped Martinique shed its colonial status in 1946 to become an overseas departement of France. He was affiliated with the French Communist Party early in his career but became disillusioned in the 1950s and founded the Martinique Progressive Party in 1958. He later allied with the Socialist Party in France's National Assembly, where he served from 1946 to 1956 and from 1958 to 1993. He died in 2008, aged 94.