A New History of Ireland: Ireland Under the Union Volume 5

A New History of Ireland: Ireland Under the Union Volume 5

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This ten-volume series covers the history of Ireland from earliest times to the present. Representing a harvesting of modern scholarship on the subject, its contributors are mainly historians, but include historical geographers and specialists in other related disciplines such as languages and literature, the visual arts, and music. The present volume opens with a character study of the period, followed by twenty chapters of narrative history, with a survey of 'Land and people, c 1841'. Further chapters cover the economy, legal developments, literature in English, education, administration and the public service, and emigration, ending with a study of Ireland in 1870. Contributors: D. H. Akenson, J. C. Brady, R. V. Comerford, S. J. Connolly, James S. Donnelly, jr., David Noel Doyle, Thomas Flanagan, T. W. Freeman, Oliver MacDonagh, R. B. McDowell, Patrick J. O'Farrell, Cormac O Grada, W. E. Vaughan. Volumes published to date: II Medieval Ireland 1169-1534 III Early Modern Ireland 1534-1691 IV Eighteenth-Century Ireland 1691-1800 VIII A Chronology of Irish History to 1976 A Companion to Irish History Part I IX Maps, Genealogies, Lists A Companion to Irish History Part II

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  • Hardback | 946 pages
  • 168.1 x 242.8 x 57.4mm | 1,728.21g
  • Oxford University Press
  • Clarendon Press
  • OxfordUnited Kingdom
  • English
  • 40 pp plates, 19 maps and 3 figures
  • 0198217439
  • 9780198217435

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'This beautifully produced book, with over ninety well-chosen and clear illustrations, is a triumph of collective scholarship and a major contribution to the understanding of modern Irish history.' Times Literary Supplement 'As another volume of A New History of Ireland appears, one is yet again impressed by its sheer size, attractive format, handsome type-face, and excellent illustrations ... this one is in most matters fully up to date, deploying impressive mental agility, interestingly written, and lively as well as informative.' R. Theodore Hoppen, University of Hull, The English Historical Review, January 1991 'The real justification for these great cathedrals of historical lore is to serve up a narrative, well-written, authoritative and fair ... on this criterion the volume is successful and probably the best of the three modern volumes.' L.M. Cullen, Trinity College, Dublin, Irish Economic and Social History, Vol. XVII 1990 'the essays in Ireland Under the Union, 1801-70 represent the best of current scholarship in their respective areas ... Indeed, the overall standard is so high that it almost seems invidious to single out specific essays for special praise. Perhaps the most original contribution is Doyle's rich description and analysis of Catholic and Protestant Irish in North America, but the essays by most of the other contributors are scarcely less informative and stimulating - and those by MacDonagh and Flanagan are especially graceful.' Kerby A. Miller, University of Missouri-Columbia, Albion 'a milestone in Irish historiography ... This work comes closer than any of its predecessors to fulfilling the aims of the New History; it is collective scholarship at its best ... scholarly triumph ... the most outstanding volume that has appeared so far in this series; as such, it is an eloquent tribute to Moody's original vision.' Gary Owens, University of Western Ontario, Journal of Modern History, Volume 65, Number 1, March 1993 'A third impression of Volume II of the New history of Ireland, first published in 1976, testifies to its continuing utility ... enduringly useful volume.' T.C. Barnard, Hertford College, Oxford, Irish Historical Studies 'important ... Almost all the chapters deserve careful reading and the volume should not be seen merely as a monument to the work of scholars in increasing our understanding over the last twenty years. It should also stimulate continued debate about the Union and the dynamic of the relations between Britain and Ireland of which we are very directly the inheritors.' Allen Warren, History No. 253, June 1993

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