New England Frontier: Puritans and Indians, 1620-75

New England Frontier: Puritans and Indians, 1620-75

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By (author) Alden T. Vaughan

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  • Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
  • Format: Paperback | 512 pages
  • Dimensions: 140mm x 183mm x 30mm | 272g
  • Publication date: 15 April 1995
  • Publication City/Country: Oklahoma
  • ISBN 10: 080612718X
  • ISBN 13: 9780806127187
  • Edition: 3, Revised
  • Edition statement: 3rd Revised edition
  • Illustrations note: 18 illustrations, 2 maps, notes, bibliography, index
  • Sales rank: 731,029

Product description

In contrast to most accounts of Puritan-Indian relations, New England Frontier argues that the first two generations of Puritan settlers were neither generally hostile toward their Indian neighbors nor indifferent to their territorial rights. Rather, American Puritans-especially their political and religious leaders-sought peaceful and equitable relations as the first step in molding the Indians into neo-Englishmen. With a new introduction, this third edition affords the reader a clear, balanced overview of a complex and sensitive area of American history. "Vaughan has exhaustively examined the records and written a book of indispensable value to any student of colonial New England."-New York Times Book Review Alden T. Vaughan, Professor Emeritus of History at Columbia University is the author or editor of numerous books, including The Puritan Tradition in America, 1620-1730, New England's Prospect, and Puritans among the Indians.

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Back cover copy

In contrast to most accounts of Puritan-Indian relations, New England Frontier argues that the first two generations of Puritan settlers were neither generally hostile toward their Indian neighbors nor indifferent to their territorial rights. Rather, American Puritans - especially their political and religious leaders - sought peaceful and equitable relations as the first step in molding the Indians into neo-Englishmen. When accumulated Indian resentments culminated in the war of 1675, however, the relatively benign intercultural contact of the preceding fifty-five-year period rapidly declined. With a new introduction updating developments in Puritan-Indian studies in the last fifteen years, this third edition affords the reader a clear, balanced overview of a complex and sensitive area of American history.