Neo-Babylonian Court Procedure

Neo-Babylonian Court Procedure

Hardback Cuneiform Monographs

By (author) Shalom E. Holtz

$185.24

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  • Publisher: Brill
  • Format: Hardback | 338 pages
  • Dimensions: 168mm x 246mm x 25mm | 680g
  • Publication date: 24 April 2009
  • Publication City/Country: Leiden
  • ISBN 10: 9004174966
  • ISBN 13: 9789004174962
  • Illustrations note: black & white tables

Product description

Even though scholars have known of Neo-Babylonian legal texts almost since Assyriology's very beginnings, no comprehensive study of court procedure has been undertaken. This lack is particularly glaring in light of studies of court procedure in earlier periods of Mesopotamian history. With these studies as a model, this book begins by presenting a comprehensive classification of the text-types that made up the 'tablet trail' of records of the adjudication of legal disputes in the Neo-Babylonian. In presenting this text-typology, it considers the texts' legal function within the adjudicatory process. Based on this, the book describes the adjudicatory process as it is attested in private records as well as in records from the Eanna at Uruk.

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Author information

Shalom E. Holtz, Ph.D. (2006) in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, University of Pennsylvania, is assistant professor of Bible at Yeshiva University.

Back cover copy

Even though scholars have known of Neo-Babylonian legal texts almost since Assyriology's very beginnings, no comprehensive study of court procedure has been undertaken. This lack is particularly glaring in light of studies of court procedure in earlier periods of Mesopotamian history. With these studies as a model, this book begins by presenting a comprehensive classification of the text-types that made up the "tablet trail" of records of the adjudication of legal disputes in the Neo-Babylonian period. In presenting this text-typology, it considers the texts' legal function within the adjudicatory process. Based on this, the book describes the adjudicatory process as it is attested in private records as well as in records from the Eanna at Uruk.

Table of contents

PART I: FUNCTIONAL TYPOLOGY OF TEXTS 1. Decision Records 2. Other Text-Types Including the Resolution of Disputes 3. Preliminary Protocols and Records of Statements in Court 4. The dababu- and quttu -Type Summonses 5. Text-Types Calling for Evidence 6. Text-Types Ensuring an Individual's Presence 7. Other Text-Types PART II: NEO BABYLONIAN ADJUDICATORY PROCEDURE 8. The Adjudication of Private Disputes: The "Royal Judges" Decision Records and Other Texts 9. The Adjudicatory Process in the Eanna 10. The Neo-Babylonian Tablet Trail in Comparative Perspective