Naked Economics - Undressing the Dismal Science

Naked Economics - Undressing the Dismal Science

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Description

Naked Economics makes up for all of those Econ 101 lectures you slept through (or avoided) in college, demystifying key concepts, laying bare the truths behind the numbers, and answering those questions you have always been too embarrassed to ask. For all the discussion of Alan Greenspan in the media, does anyone know what the Fed actually does? And what about those blackouts in California? Were they a conspiracy on the part of the power companies? Economics is life. There's no way to understand the important issues without it. Now, with Charles Wheelan's breezy tour, there's no reason to fear this highly relevant subject. With the commonsensical examples and brilliantly acerbic commentary we've come to associate with The Economist, Wheelan brings economics to life. Amazingly, he does so with nary a chart, graph, or mathematical equation in sight certainly a feat to be witnessed firsthand. Economics is a crucial subject. There's no way to understand the important issues without it. Now, with Charles Wheelan's breezy tour, there's also no reason to fear it. "

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Product details

  • Paperback | 388 pages
  • 139.7 x 208.28 x 22.86mm | 249.47g
  • WW Norton & Co
  • New York, United States
  • English
  • Reprint
  • 0393324869
  • 9780393324860
  • 127,954

Review quote

Wheelan has an anti-Midas touch. If he touched gold he would turn it to life. Burton G. Malkiel, from the foreword--Burton G. Malkiel"

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Customer reviews

I am undergrad economics student and this is by far the best book to introduce someone to real economics I've read. I've read several books, written for general audience by economists, like Freakonomics, and Tim Harford's, or Steven Landsburg's, but those merely try to explain funny facts with economics techniques or ideas. This book really tries to introduce the basic conclusions about economics that are more or less widely agreed by the professionals. We see that government is absolutely necessary for prosperity, but not too much. The case for free trade is probably one of the strongest in the science, and the book also explains that. These and many other subjects that I studied were represented in a book and explained in a clear and sometimes funny way to a lay person. I can't say I've learned anything I didn't already know from studying, but I wish I had read it just before starting to get my degree.show more
by Luis Fonseca