Mrs.Dalloway

Mrs.Dalloway

Hardback Collector's Library

By (author) Virginia Woolf, Afterword by Anna South

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  • Publisher: Collector's Library
  • Format: Hardback | 224 pages
  • Dimensions: 102mm x 150mm x 20mm | 159g
  • Publication date: 1 September 2003
  • Publication City/Country: Cirencester
  • ISBN 10: 1904633242
  • ISBN 13: 9781904633242
  • Edition: New edition
  • Edition statement: New edition
  • Sales rank: 93,062

Product description

In Virgnia Woolf's novel - which inspired the 2003 film The Hours - Mrs Dalloway is an assured socialite. Yet as she prepares for her party on a hot London day in June 1923, she feels the terror of existence and the pull of death.

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Review quote

"Virginia Woolf stands as the chief figure of Modernism in England, and must be included with Joyce and Proust in the realizaztion of experimental acheivements that has completely broken with tradition."-- The New York Times

Editorial reviews

Clarissa Dalloway spends a day in London reflecting on her life as she prepares for a party. Her reverie is set off by the imminence of her daughter's adulthood. This is a classic text on women and Virginia Woolf at her finest. Mrs Woolf's work was to an extent a conscious revolt against fiction based on over-precise chronicling of detailed events of which the Victorian novelists were such ardent exponents. She substituted the continuousness of experience and the imprecision of characters who take on different lights according to varying circumstances. Mrs Dalloway (1925), where everything wobbles under the changing light of a single day, is a satisfactory example of her technique. Her impressionism does not prevent the image of an early aeroplane pulling an advertising slogan across the London sky remaining one of the most vivid in the fiction of the 1920s. Review by Lord Jenkins of Hillhead, whose work includes 'The Chancellors' and 'A Life at the Centre' (Kirkus UK)